International Conference on Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Conference Places

 

For Enquiries
orthopedic@pencis.com

About the Conference

Introduction of Orthopedic and Sports Medicine conferences

International Conference on Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, organized by the Pencis group. International Conference on Orthopedics and Sports Medicine is a discussion of common Bacteria, orthopedics conference are disorders caused by organisms The focal point of orthopedics  Conferences is to bring forward discoveries, examine the system and strategic issues, assemble and keep forth basic systems between analysts, professionals, arrangement producers, and agents of orthopedics Associations. Essential orthopedics Conference put emphasis on its theme "Innovation through Information on Orthopedic and Sports Medicine" and intends to provide an impetus to health practice, administration, and training in connection to health inconsistencies and conjugation of other different points. Patients with access to a general essential care doctor have brought down available medicinal services cost than those without one, and Health results been better. orthopedics Conference is an opportunity to interact with specialists and to learn the latest Orthopedic and Sports Medicine and orthopedics conference related information.

Theme: Exploring the Recent Research and Advancements in Orthopedic and Sports Medicine

Call for Abstract

Call for Abstract/paper

Original Articles/papers are invited from Industry Persons, Scientist, Academician, Research Scholars, P.G. & U.G. Students for presentation in our International Conference. All articles/papers must be in MS-Word (.doc or .docx) format, including the title, authors name, affiliation of all authors, e-mail, abstract, keywords, Conclusion, Acknowledgment, and References.

Submit Abstract

The Candidates with eligibility can click the "Submit Paper/Abstract Now" button and fill up the online submission form and Submit it.

Abstract/Full Paper submission

Final/Full Paper submission is optional: If you don't want your abstract/full paper to be published in the Conference Abstracts & Proceedings CD (with ISBN number) and only want to present it at the conference, it is acceptable.

Page limit: There is a limit of 6-8 pages for a final/full paper. The additional page is chargeable.

Paper language: Final/Full papers should be in English.

Templates: "Final paper template," "Final abstract template"

All the final papers should be uploaded to the website online system according to "the final paper template" as word doc. or Docx since this will be the camera-ready published version. Please note that final papers that are not uploaded to the online System as a word doc./docx after the opening of final paper submissions according to the template above will not be published in the CONFERENCES Abstracts & Proceedings CD (with ISBN number)

Journal Publication

Journal Publication

All accepted papers will be included in the conference proceedings, which will be published in one of the author's prescribed Pencis journals.

Registration

Registration Procedure

  • Click the “Register Now” button at the conference page and enter your Submission ID in the Search Box
  • Your Submissions will be listed on that page. You can find the Register Now link beside your submission. Click the link, and now you will be redirected to the Conference registration form where you can make your registration using credit/debit cards
  • The Fee charged for E-Poster is to display the E-Posters only on the Website. The Abstract will be published in the conference proceeding book.

Registration Types

Speaker Registration

  • Access to all event Session
  • Certificate of Presentation
  • Handbook
  • Conference Kit
  • Tea, Coffee & Snack,
  • Lunch during the Conference
  • Publication of Abstract /Full Paper at the Conference Proceedings Book
  • Opportunity to give a Keynote/ Poster Presentations/ Plenary/ Workshop
  • Opportunity to publish your Abstract in any of our esteemed Journals discounted rate
  • Opportunity to publish your full article in our open access book with a discounted rate
  • One to One Expert Forums

Delegate (Participant) Registration

  • Access to all Event Sessions
  • Participation Certificate
  • Handbook
  • Conference Kit
  • Tea, Coffee & Snack,
  • Lunch during the Conference
  • Delegates are not allowed to present

Poster Registration

  • Includes all the above Registration Benefits
  • You will have to bring your Posters to the Conference Venue
  • Best poster award memento and certificate on stage.

Poster Guidelines

  • The poster should be 1×1 m in Size.
  • The title, contents, text, and the author’s information should be visible.
  • Present numerical data in the form of graphs rather than tables.
  • Figures make trends in the data much more evident.
  • Avoid submitting high word-count posters.
  • Poster contains, e.g., Introduction, Methods, Results, Discussion, Conclusions, and Literature.

Research Forum (Awards)

  • Includes all the above Registration Benefits.
  • The attendee should be required age limit.
  • Award memento and certificate on stage.

E-Poster Presentation

  • The amount charged for E-Posters is to display the E-Posters only on the website
  • The presenter will get an e-poster participation certificate as a soft copy
  • The abstract will be published in the particular journal and also in the conference proceeding book
  • The presenter is not required to be present in person at the Conference

Video Presentation

  • The amount charged for Video Presentation is to display the Presentation at the Conference.
  • The presenter will get a Video participation certificate as a soft copy
  • The abstract will be published in the particular journal and also in the conference proceeding book
  • The presenter is not required to be present in person at the Conference

Accompanying Person

  • Accompanying Persons are those who attend the participants at the Conference who may be either a spouse/family partner or a son/daughter and must register under this category.
  • Please note that business partners do not qualify as Accompanying Persons and are not allowed to register as an Accompanying Person.

Conference Awards

Details of Conference Awards

Pencis awards Researchers and Research organizations around the world with the motive of Encouraging and Honoring them for their Significant contributions & Achievements for the Advancement in their field of expertise. Researchers and scholars of all nationalities are eligible to receive Pencis Research awards. Nominees are judged on past accomplishments, research excellence, and outstanding academic achievements

Award Categories

Best Poster Award

Posters will be evaluated based on Presentation Style, Research Quality, and Layout/Design. Unique opportunity to combine visual and oral explanations of your projects in the form of poster presentations. Posters should have the Title (with authors affiliation & contact details), Introduction, Methods, Results (with tables, graphs, pictures) Discussion, Conclusion, References, and Acknowledgements. The size of the poster should be: 1mX1.5m; Text:16-26 pt; Headings: 32-50 pt; Title: 70 pt; Color: Preferable. Bring your poster to the meeting, using tubular packaging. Presenting duration: 10 min discussion & 5 min query per person. Eligibility: The presenter can nominate for the Award. He must be under 40 years of age as on the conference date.

Best Presentation Award

The presentation will be evaluated based on Presentation Style, Research Quality, and Layout/Design. Unique opportunity to combine visual and oral explanations of your projects in the form of poster presentations. The presentation should have the Title (with authors affiliation & contact details), Introduction, Methods, Results (with tables, graphs, pictures) Discussion, Conclusion, References, and Acknowledgements. Bring your presentation to the meeting, using a pen drive. Presenting duration: 10-20 min discussion & 5 min query per person. Eligibility: The presenter can nominate for the Award. He must be under 55 years of age as of the conference date.

Best Paper Award

Paper will be evaluated based on Format, Research Quality, and Layout/Design. The paper should have the Title (with authors affiliation & contact details), Introduction, Methods, Results (with tables, graphs, pictures) Discussion, Conclusion, References, and Acknowledgements. Eligibility: The presenter can nominate for the Award. He must be under 55 years of age as of the conference date.

Instructions

Instructions for submission

If you want to submit only your Abstract

  • If you want to publish only your abstract (it is also optional) in the CONFERENCE Abstracts & Proceedings CD (with ISBN number), upload your abstract again according to the final abstract template as word doc. or Docx.
  • If you also don't want your abstract to be published in the CONFERENCE Abstracts & Proceedings CD (with an ISBN number) and only want to present it at the conference, it is also acceptable

How to Submit your Abstract / Full Paper

Please read the instructions below then submit your Abstract/ Full Paper (or just final abstract) via the online conference system:

  • STEP 1: Please download the Abstract /Final Paper Template and submit your final paper exactly according to the template: Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Final Paper Template word format (.doc /.docx). See a final abstract template formatted according to the template.
  • STEP 2: Please assure that the Abstract/ full paper follows exactly the format and template as described in the final paper template document below since this will be the camera-ready published version. All final papers should be written only in English and “word document" in .doc or .docx format.
  • STEP 3: You can submit your final paper(s) to the online conference system only by uploading/ Re-submission your current submission.
  • STEP 4: After logging/using submission ID in the online conference system, click on the "Re-submission" link at the bottom of the page.
  • STEP 5: After the "Resubmission page" opens, upload your abstract/ final paper (it should be MS word document -doc. or Docx-).

General Information

  • Dress's Code: Participants have to wear a formal dress. There are no restrictions on color or design. The audience attending only the ceremony can wear clothing of their own choice.
  • Certificate Distribution: Each presenter's name will be called & asked to collect their certificate on the Stage with an official photographer to capture the moments.

Terms & Conditions

Pencis Terms & Conditions

Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Conferences Terms & Conditions Policy was last updated on June 25, 2022.

Privacy Policy

Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Conference Customer personal information for our legitimate business purposes, to process and respond to inquiries, and provide our services, to manage our relationship with editors, authors, institutional clients, service providers, and other business contacts, to market our services and subscription management. We do not sell, rent/ trade your personal information to third parties.

Relationship

Orthopedic and Sports Medicine conference Operate a Customer Association Management and email list program, which we use to inform customers and other contacts about our services, including our publications and events. Such marketing messages may contain tracking technologies to track subscriber activity relating to engagement, demographics, and other data, and to build subscriber profiles.

Disclaimer

All editorial matters published on this website represent the opinions of the authors and not necessarily those of the Publisher with the publications. Statements and opinions expressed do not represent the official policies of the relevant Associations unless so stated. Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the material that appears on this website. Please ignore, however, that some errors may occur.

Responsibility

Delegates are personally responsible for their belongings at the venue. The Organizers will not be held accountable for any stolen or missing items belonging to Delegates, Speakers, or Attendees; due to any reason whatsoever.

Insurance

International Conference on Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Registration fees does not include insurance of any kind.

Press and Media

Press permission must be getting from the International Conference on orthopedics confernce Organizing Committee before the event. The press will not quote speakers or delegates unless they have obtained their approval in writing. This conference is not associated with any commercial meeting company.

Transportation

International Conference on Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Please note that any (or) all traffic and parking is the responsibility of the registrant.

Requesting an Invitation Letter

International Conference on Orthopedics and Sports Medicine For security purposes, the letter of invitation will be sent only to those individuals who had registered for the conference. Once your registration is complete, please contact orthopedics@Pencis.com to request a personalized letter of invitation.

Cancellation Policy

If International Conference on Orthopedics and Sports Medicine cancels this event for any reason, you will receive a credit for 100% of the registration fee paid. You may use this credit for another International Conference on Orthopedics and Sports Medicine event which must occur within one year from the date of cancellation.

Postponement Policy

If International Conference on Orthopedics and Sports Medicine postpones an event for any reason and you are unable or indisposed to attend on rescheduled dates, you will receive a credit for 100% of the registration fee paid. You may use this credit for another International Conference on Orthopedics and Sports Medicine which must occur within one year from the date of postponement.

Transfer of registration

International Conference on Orthopedics and Sports Medicine All fully paid registrations are transferable to other persons from the same organization if the registered person is unable to attend the event. The registered person must make transfers in writing to orthopedics@Pencis.com. Details must include the full name of an alternative person, their title, contact phone number, and email address. All other registration details will be assigned to the new person unless otherwise specified. Registration can be transferred from one conference to another conference of Pencis if the person is unable to attend one of the meetings. However, Registration cannot be transferred if it will be intimated within 14 days of the particular conference. The transferred registrations will not be eligible for Refund.

Visa Information

International Conference on Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Keeping given increased security measures, we would like to request all the participants to apply for Visa as soon as possible. Pencis will not directly contact embassies and consulates on behalf of visa applicants. All delegates or invitees should apply for Business Visa only. Important note for failed visa applications: Visa issues cannot come under the consideration of cancellation policy of Pencis, including the inability to obtain a visa.

Refund Policy

International Conference on Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Regarding refunds, all bank charges will be for the registrant's account. All cancellations or modifications of registration must make in writing to orthopedics@pencis.com

If the registrant is unable to attend and is not in a position to transfer his/her participation to another person or event, then the following refund arrangements apply:

Keeping given advance payments towards Venue, Printing, Shipping, Hotels and other overheads, we had to keep Refund Policy is as following conditions,

  • Before 60 days of the Conference: Eligible for Full Refund less $100 Service Fee
  • Within 60-30 days of Conference: Eligible for 50% of payment Refund
  • Within 30 days of Conference: Not eligible for Refund
  • E-Poster Payments will not be refunded.

Accommodation Cancellation Policy

International Conference on Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Accommodation Providers such as hotels have their cancellation policies, and they generally apply when cancellations are made less than 30 days before arrival. Please contact us as soon as possible if you wish to cancel or amend your accommodation. Pencis will advise the cancellation policy of your accommodation provider, before withdrawing or changing your booking, to ensure you are fully aware of any non-refundable deposits.

Sponsorship

Sponsorship Details

International Conference on Orthopedic and Sports Medicine warmly invites you to sponsor or exhibit of International Conferences. We expect participants more than 200 numbers for our International conferences will provide an opportunity to hear and meet/ads to Researchers, Practitioners, and Business Professionals to share expertise, foster collaborations, and assess rising innovations across the world in the core area of mechanical engineering.

Diamond Sponsorship

  1. Acknowledgment during the opening of the conference
  2. Complimentary Booth of size 10 meters square
  3. Four (4) delegate’s complimentary registrations with lunch
  4. Include marketing document in the delegate pack
  5. Logo on Conference website, Banners, Backdrop, and conference proceedings
  6. One exhibition stand (1×1 meters) for the conference
  7. One full cover page size ad in conference proceedings
  8. Opportunities for Short speech at events
  9. Opportunity to sponsors conference kit
  10. Opportunity to sponsors conference lanyards, ID cards
  11. Opportunity to sponsors conference lunch
  12. Recognition of video ads
  13. 150-word company profile and contact details in the delegate pack

Platinum Sponsorship

  1. Three (3) delegate’s complimentary registrations with lunch
  2. Recognition on video ads
  3. Opportunity to sponsors conference lunch
  4. Opportunity to sponsors conference lanyards, ID cards
  5. Opportunity to sponsors conference kit
  6. Opportunities for Short speech at events
  7. One full-page size ad in conference proceedings
  8. One exhibition stand (1×1 meters) for the conference
  9. Logo on Conference website, Banners, Backdrop, and conference proceedings
  10. Include marketing document in the delegate pack
  11. Complimentary Booth of size 10 meters square
  12. Acknowledgment during the opening of the conference
  13. 100-word company profile and contact details in the delegate pack

Gold Sponsorship

  1. Two (2) delegate’s complimentary registrations with lunch
  2. Opportunities for Short speech at events
  3. Logo on Conference website, Banners, Backdrop, and conference proceedings
  4. Include marketing document in the delegate pack
  5. Complimentary Booth of size 10 meters square
  6. Acknowledgment during the opening of the conference
  7. 100-word company profile and contact details in the delegate pack
  8. ½ page size ad in conference proceedings

Silver Sponsorship

  1. Acknowledgment during the opening of the conference
  2. One(1) delegate’s complimentary registrations with lunch
  3. Include marketing document in the delegate pack
  4. Logo on Conference website, Banners, Backdrop, and conference proceedings
  5. ¼ page size ad in conference proceedings
  6. 100-word company profile and contact details in the delegate pack

Individual Sponsorship

  1. Acknowledgment during the opening of the conference
  2. One(1) delegate’s complimentary registrations with lunch

Registration Fees

Details Registration fees
Diamond Sponsorship USD 2999
Platinum Sponsorship USD 2499
Gold Sponsorship USD 1999
Silver Sponsorship USD 1499
Individual Sponsorship USD 999

Exhibitions

Exhibitions Details

Exhibit your Products & Services

Exhibit your Products & Services in International Conference on Orthopedic and Sports Medicine. Exhibitors are welcomed from Commercial and Non-Commercial Organizations related to the conference title.

  • The best platform to develop new partnerships & collaborations.
  • Best location to speed up your route into every territory in the World.
  • Our exhibitor booths were visited 4-5 times by 80% of the attendees during the conference.
  • Network development with both Academia and Business.

Exhibitor Benefits

  • Exhibit booth of Size-3X3 sqm.
  • Promotion of your logo/Company Name/Brand Name through the conference website.
  • Promotional video on company products during the conference (Post session and Breaks).
  • Logo recognition in the Scientific program, Conference banner, and flyer.
  • One A4 flyer inserts in the conference kit.
  • An opportunity to sponsor 1 Poster Presentation Award.

Session Tracks

Conference Session Tracks 

Anterior Longitudinal Ligament, Arthroplasty, Arthroscopy, Bone and Joint Infections, Consequences of Arthroscopy, Exercise and Sports Medicine, Foot and ankle surgery, Hand and upper extremity, Hip and Knee surgery, Hip Arthroplasty, Joint Disorders, Knee Arthroplasty, Medical Malpractice and Legal Issues, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Obesity and Weight Management, Orthopedic Clinical Determination, Orthopedic oncologist, Orthopedic trauma, Orthopedics, Orthopedics Surgery, Osseointegration, Osteoarthritis, Osteoporosis, Pain Management, Pediatric orthopedics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Podiatry, Prosthetics and Orthopedicsi, Residents, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Shoulder and elbow, Shoulder Arthroplasty, Spinal Disorders, Spinal Surgery, Surgical sports medicine, Total joint reconstruction (arthroplasty), Other

Anterior Longitudinal Ligame

The anterior longitudinal ligament (ALL) is a strong, fibrous band of tissue that runs vertically along the anterior (front) surface of the vertebral bodies in the spinal column. It extends from the base of the skull down to the sacrum, and helps to stabilize and support the spinal column by preventing excessive hyperextension (backward bending) of the spine.

The ALL is one of the major stabilizing ligaments of the spine, and works in conjunction with other ligaments, muscles, and bones to maintain the proper alignment and movement of the spine. Injuries to the ALL can occur due to trauma, such as in a car accident or a fall, and can result in pain, stiffness, and instability of the spine. Treatment for ALL injuries typically involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery.

Arthroplasty

Arthroplasty is a surgical procedure in which a damaged or diseased joint is replaced with an artificial joint, also known as a prosthesis. The prosthesis is designed to replicate the function of the original joint and improve mobility and quality of life for the patient.

Arthroplasty is commonly performed on joints that have been damaged by arthritis, injury, or other conditions that cause joint deterioration. The most common types of arthroplasty include hip replacement, knee replacement, and shoulder replacement surgery.

During the arthroplasty procedure, the surgeon removes the damaged joint and replaces it with a prosthetic device made of metal, plastic, or ceramic materials. The prosthetic joint is designed to move and function like a natural joint, allowing the patient to resume normal activities without pain or stiffness.

Recovery time and rehabilitation after arthroplasty can vary depending on the type of surgery and the individual patient's health and condition. Physical therapy is typically recommended to help patients regain strength, mobility, and flexibility in the affected joint.

Arthroscopy

Arthroscopy is a minimally invasive surgical procedure that allows a surgeon to examine and treat a joint by inserting a thin, flexible instrument called an arthroscope into the joint through small incisions. The arthroscope contains a camera that provides a clear view of the joint's interior, allowing the surgeon to diagnose and treat a range of conditions affecting the joint.

Arthroscopy is commonly performed on the knee, shoulder, ankle, elbow, wrist, and hip joints. The procedure is typically done on an outpatient basis, meaning the patient can go home the same day as the surgery.

During the arthroscopy procedure, the surgeon makes a small incision near the joint and inserts the arthroscope into the joint. The camera on the end of the arthroscope allows the surgeon to view the joint on a video screen, enabling them to diagnose and treat conditions such as torn ligaments, cartilage damage, and joint inflammation.

Arthroscopy is considered a minimally invasive surgery, which means that it typically results in less pain, scarring, and recovery time compared to traditional open surgery. Recovery time and rehabilitation after arthroscopy can vary depending on the type of procedure and the individual patient's health and condition, but physical therapy is typically recommended to help patients regain strength, mobility, and flexibility in the affected joint.

Bone and Joint Infections

Bone and joint infections are infections that occur in the bones, joints, or surrounding tissues. They can be caused by bacteria, viruses, or fungi, and can result in a range of symptoms including pain, swelling, stiffness, and fever.

Common types of bone and joint infections include osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, and prosthetic joint infections. Osteomyelitis is an infection of the bone tissue, while septic arthritis is an infection of the joint space. Prosthetic joint infections occur in patients who have had joint replacement surgery and can be difficult to treat.

Risk factors for bone and joint infections include having a weakened immune system, having diabetes, using injection drugs, having a history of skin infections or other infections, and undergoing surgery or other invasive procedures.

Treatment for bone and joint infections typically involves antibiotics, which may be given intravenously for severe infections. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to drain pus or remove infected tissue. Physical therapy may also be recommended to help patients regain strength, mobility, and flexibility in the affected joint.

Prevention of bone and joint infections involves maintaining good hygiene, washing hands regularly, avoiding contact with people who have infections, and seeking prompt medical attention for any signs of infection.

Consequences of Arthroscopy

While arthroscopy is generally considered a safe and minimally invasive procedure, there can be some potential consequences associated with it. Some of the most common consequences of arthroscopy may include:

Infection: Although rare, there is a risk of developing an infection at the site of the arthroscopy procedure.

Bleeding: Some bleeding is normal after an arthroscopy, but excessive bleeding can occur in rare cases.

Nerve damage: In rare cases, nerves near the joint being examined or treated can be damaged during the procedure, leading to numbness or weakness in the affected area.

Blood clots: Patients who undergo arthroscopy may be at a slightly increased risk of developing blood clots in their legs or lungs.

Pain and swelling: Mild to moderate pain and swelling is common after an arthroscopy, but it typically resolves within a few days.

Anesthesia-related complications: General anesthesia, which is sometimes used during arthroscopy, can carry risks such as allergic reactions or breathing problems.

It's important for patients to discuss the potential risks and benefits of arthroscopy with their healthcare provider before the procedure to determine if it's the right choice for them. Most patients experience a quick recovery and improved joint function after the procedure.

Exercise and Sports Medicine

Exercise and sports medicine is a field of medicine that focuses on the prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of injuries and conditions related to physical activity, sports, and exercise. It encompasses a range of specialties, including sports medicine, orthopedic surgery, physical therapy, and rehabilitation.

The goals of exercise and sports medicine are to help athletes and active individuals stay healthy and injury-free, enhance athletic performance, and promote overall physical health and wellness. The field is not limited to professional athletes but also includes individuals of all ages and activity levels, from weekend warriors to high school and college athletes.

Common conditions and injuries treated in exercise and sports medicine include muscle strains, ligament sprains, fractures, joint dislocations, concussion, and overuse injuries such as tendonitis and stress fractures. Treatment options may include physical therapy, rehabilitation exercises, medication, and in some cases, surgery.

In addition to treating injuries and conditions, exercise and sports medicine also emphasizes injury prevention and education, with a focus on proper technique, conditioning, and nutrition. Sports medicine specialists may work with athletes and coaches to develop training programs that optimize performance and reduce the risk of injury.

Overall, exercise and sports medicine plays a critical role in keeping athletes and active individuals healthy and injury-free, and helping them achieve their full potential.

Foot and ankle surgery

Foot and ankle surgery is a branch of orthopedic surgery that deals with the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of conditions affecting the foot and ankle. The foot and ankle are complex structures that consist of numerous bones, joints, muscles, tendons, and ligaments, and they play an important role in mobility and balance.

Foot and ankle surgery may be necessary to treat a range of conditions, including fractures, sprains, arthritis, bunions, heel pain, flat feet, and Achilles tendonitis. Surgical procedures may include reconstructive surgery, arthroscopy, joint replacement, and fusion surgery.

Before surgery, a thorough evaluation is typically conducted to determine the underlying cause of the condition and the most appropriate course of treatment. In some cases, non-surgical treatments such as physical therapy, medication, and orthotics may be recommended before considering surgery.

Surgical procedures for foot and ankle conditions are typically performed under general or regional anesthesia, and may involve minimally invasive techniques to minimize pain and recovery time. Patients may be able to return to normal activities within a few weeks after surgery, depending on the type and extent of the procedure.

Recovery and rehabilitation after foot and ankle surgery may include physical therapy, rehabilitation exercises, and the use of braces or other supportive devices. In some cases, ongoing follow-up care may be necessary to monitor progress and prevent future complications.

Overall, foot and ankle surgery can help relieve pain and improve mobility, allowing patients to resume their normal activities and maintain a high quality of life.

Hand and upper extremity

Hand and upper extremity surgery is a subspecialty of orthopedic surgery that deals with the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of conditions affecting the hand, wrist, forearm, elbow, and shoulder. The hand and upper extremity are complex structures that consist of numerous bones, joints, muscles, tendons, and ligaments, and they play an important role in movement, sensation, and function.

Hand and upper extremity surgery may be necessary to treat a range of conditions, including fractures, dislocations, tendon injuries, nerve injuries, carpal tunnel syndrome, trigger finger, tennis elbow, and rotator cuff injuries. Surgical procedures may include joint replacement, tendon repair, nerve repair, and arthroscopic surgery.

Before surgery, a thorough evaluation is typically conducted to determine the underlying cause of the condition and the most appropriate course of treatment. In some cases, non-surgical treatments such as physical therapy, medication, and immobilization may be recommended before considering surgery.

Surgical procedures for hand and upper extremity conditions are typically performed under general or regional anesthesia, and may involve minimally invasive techniques to minimize pain and recovery time. Patients may be able to return to normal activities within a few weeks after surgery, depending on the type and extent of the procedure.

Recovery and rehabilitation after hand and upper extremity surgery may include physical therapy, rehabilitation exercises, and the use of braces or other supportive devices. In some cases, ongoing follow-up care may be necessary to monitor progress and prevent future complications.

Overall, hand and upper extremity surgery can help relieve pain and improve function,

 

Hip and Knee surgery

Hip and knee surgery are subspecialties of orthopedic surgery that deal with the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of conditions affecting the hip and knee joints. The hip and knee are weight-bearing joints that are essential for mobility, balance, and overall function.

Hip and knee surgery may be necessary to treat a range of conditions, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, fractures, dislocations, ligament injuries, and hip dysplasia. Surgical procedures may include joint replacement, arthroscopy, and osteotomy.

Before surgery, a thorough evaluation is typically conducted to determine the underlying cause of the condition and the most appropriate course of treatment. In some cases, non-surgical treatments such as physical therapy, medication, and the use of assistive devices may be recommended before considering surgery.

Surgical procedures for hip and knee conditions are typically performed under general or regional anesthesia, and may involve minimally invasive techniques to minimize pain and recovery time. Patients may be able to return to normal activities within a few weeks after surgery, depending on the type and extent of the procedure.

Hip Arthroplasty

Hip arthroplasty, also known as hip replacement surgery, is a surgical procedure that involves removing a damaged or diseased hip joint and replacing it with an artificial joint. Hip arthroplasty is typically recommended for patients who have severe hip pain and limited mobility due to conditions such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or avascular necrosis.

During the procedure, the damaged hip joint is removed and replaced with a prosthetic implant made of metal, plastic, or ceramic components. The implant is designed to mimic the function of a healthy hip joint and allow for smooth, pain-free movement.

Hip arthroplasty may be performed using a traditional "open" surgical approach or a minimally invasive technique that involves smaller incisions and less muscle and tissue disruption. The choice of approach depends on the patient's individual condition and the surgeon's preference.

After surgery, patients typically stay in the hospital for several days to monitor their recovery and manage pain. Rehabilitation and physical therapy are essential components of the recovery process and may involve exercises to strengthen the hip joint and improve mobility.

While hip arthroplasty is generally considered a safe and effective procedure, it does carry some risks, including infection, blood clots, implant failure, and nerve damage. Patients should carefully follow their surgeon's instructions for post-operative care and follow-up appointments to minimize the risk of complications.

Overall, hip arthroplasty can help relieve pain, improve mobility, and restore quality of life for patients with severe hip joint damage or disease.

Joint Disorders

Joint disorders are conditions that affect the joints, which are the areas where two or more bones come together. Joint disorders can affect people of all ages and can be caused by a variety of factors, including injury, disease, and wear and tear over time.

Some common joint disorders include:

Osteoarthritis: A degenerative condition that causes the cartilage in the joints to wear down over time, resulting in pain, stiffness, and reduced mobility.

Rheumatoid arthritis: An autoimmune disorder that causes inflammation and damage to the joints, resulting in pain, swelling, and deformity.

Gout: A form of arthritis that occurs when uric acid builds up in the joints, causing sudden and severe pain and swelling.

Bursitis: Inflammation of the bursae, which are small sacs of fluid that cushion the joints and help reduce friction.

Tendinitis: Inflammation of the tendons, which are the fibrous tissues that connect muscles to bones.

Sprains and strains: Injuries that occur when the ligaments or muscles around a joint are stretched or torn.

Treatment for joint disorders may include medication, physical therapy, assistive devices such as braces or crutches, or surgery in more severe cases. It is important to seek prompt medical attention for joint pain or stiffness, as early diagnosis and treatment can help prevent further damage and improve outcomes.

Knee Arthroplasty

Knee arthroplasty, also known as knee replacement surgery, is a procedure that involves removing a damaged or diseased knee joint and replacing it with an artificial joint. Knee arthroplasty is typically recommended for patients who have severe knee pain and limited mobility due to conditions such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or a knee injury.

During the procedure, the damaged parts of the knee joint are removed and replaced with prosthetic components made of metal, plastic, or ceramic. The implant is designed to mimic the function of a healthy knee joint and allow for smooth, pain-free movement.

Knee arthroplasty may be performed using a traditional "open" surgical approach or a minimally invasive technique that involves smaller incisions and less muscle and tissue disruption. The choice of approach depends on the patient's individual condition and the surgeon's preference.

After surgery, patients typically stay in the hospital for several days to monitor their recovery and manage pain. Rehabilitation and physical therapy are essential components of the recovery process and may involve exercises to strengthen the knee joint and improve mobility.

While knee arthroplasty is generally considered a safe and effective procedure, it does carry some risks, including infection, blood clots, implant failure, and nerve damage. Patients should carefully follow their surgeon's instructions for post-operative care and follow-up appointments to minimize the risk of complications.

Overall, knee arthroplasty can help relieve pain, improve mobility, and restore quality of life for patients with severe knee joint damage or disease.

Medical Malpractice and Legal Issues

Medical malpractice refers to a situation where a healthcare professional or facility fails to provide appropriate care, resulting in injury, harm, or even death to the patient. Medical malpractice cases can arise from a wide range of situations, including misdiagnosis, surgical errors, medication errors, and birth injuries, among others.

In order for a medical malpractice case to be successful, the plaintiff (i.e., the patient or their family) must typically prove four elements: duty of care, breach of duty, causation, and damages. This means showing that the healthcare provider had a duty to provide appropriate care, failed to meet that duty (i.e., breached the standard of care), and that this breach caused harm to the patient.

Medical malpractice cases can be complex and time-consuming, and often require the involvement of medical experts to provide testimony and analysis. Patients and their families may choose to work with a medical malpractice lawyer to help navigate the legal process and ensure that their rights are protected.

In addition to medical malpractice, there are a number of other legal issues that can arise in the healthcare field, including issues related to patient privacy, insurance coverage, and healthcare policy. Healthcare providers and facilities must navigate a complex regulatory environment that includes federal and state laws, as well as professional standards and guidelines.

Overall, healthcare providers and facilities have a legal and ethical obligation to provide high-quality care and to protect the rights and well-being of their patients. When issues arise, patients and their families have a range of legal options available to them to seek justice and compensation for any harm suffered.

Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a type of bacteria that is resistant to many commonly used antibiotics, including methicillin, penicillin, and cephalosporins. MRSA infections can be difficult to treat, as they are not responsive to many of the drugs that are typically used to treat staph infections.

MRSA can cause a range of infections, including skin infections, pneumonia, bloodstream infections, and surgical site infections. People who are at increased risk for MRSA infections include those with weakened immune systems, patients in hospitals or long-term care facilities, and people with open wounds or skin conditions.

Prevention of MRSA infections is critical, particularly in healthcare settings. Healthcare providers can take steps to reduce the risk of MRSA transmission, including proper hand hygiene, using gloves and other protective equipment, and appropriately disinfecting medical equipment and surfaces.

Obesity and Weight Management

Obesity is a medical condition characterized by excessive accumulation of body fat that poses a risk to an individual's health. Obesity can increase the risk of several medical conditions, including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, high blood pressure, and certain types of cancer. Obesity is typically measured using the body mass index (BMI), which is calculated by dividing an individual's weight in kilograms by their height in meters squared.

Weight management is the process of achieving and maintaining a healthy weight through a combination of dietary and lifestyle changes. This may include changes to an individual's diet, physical activity levels, and behavioral habits.

There are several approaches to weight management, including:

Diet and nutrition: This involves making dietary changes to reduce caloric intake and promote healthy eating habits.

Physical activity: Increasing physical activity can help burn calories and improve overall health.

Behavioral therapy: This approach aims to change an individual's behavior and thought patterns surrounding food and exercise.

Medications: There are several medications available that can help with weight loss, although they are typically used in conjunction with other weight management strategies.

Bariatric surgery: This is a surgical procedure that can help individuals with severe obesity achieve significant weight loss.

Weight management is a long-term process that requires ongoing commitment and effort. It is important to work with a healthcare professional or registered dietitian to develop a personalized weight management plan that is safe and effective.

Orthopedic Clinical Determination

Orthopedic clinical determination refers to the process of making a diagnosis and developing a treatment plan for patients with musculoskeletal disorders or injuries. This process involves a comprehensive evaluation of the patient's medical history, symptoms, and physical examination findings.

During the evaluation, the orthopedic specialist may order imaging studies such as X-rays, MRI scans, or CT scans to help diagnose the problem. Blood tests or other laboratory tests may also be ordered to rule out other conditions that may be causing the symptoms.

Based on the evaluation, the orthopedic specialist will make a clinical determination and develop a treatment plan that is tailored to the patient's specific needs. This may involve a combination of non-surgical treatments such as physical therapy, medications, or injections, as well as surgical interventions if necessary.

It is important for patients to communicate openly with their orthopedic specialist and follow their recommended treatment plan to achieve the best possible outcomes.

Orthopedic oncologist

An orthopedic oncologist is a medical doctor who specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of bone and soft tissue tumors. These tumors can be benign or malignant, and may occur in any part of the body, but are commonly found in the limbs, pelvis, or spine.

Orthopedic oncologists work closely with a team of specialists, including radiologists, pathologists, and medical and radiation oncologists, to provide comprehensive care for patients with bone and soft tissue tumors. They use a variety of diagnostic tests, such as MRI, CT scan, and biopsy, to accurately diagnose the tumor and determine the best course of treatment.

Treatment options for bone and soft tissue tumors may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, or a combination of these approaches. The goal of treatment is to remove the tumor while preserving as much function and mobility as possible.

Orthopedic oncologists also work closely with patients to manage pain and other symptoms associated with bone and soft tissue tumors, and provide ongoing monitoring and follow-up care to ensure the best possible outcomes for their patients.

Orthopedic oncologist

Orthopedic trauma refers to injuries to the musculoskeletal system, which includes bones, joints, muscles, tendons, and ligaments, caused by high-energy accidents such as falls, motor vehicle accidents, sports injuries, and other traumatic events. These injuries can be complex and require specialized care.

Orthopedic trauma specialists are doctors who specialize in the treatment of acute and complex injuries to the musculoskeletal system. They have specialized training and expertise in the management of traumatic injuries, including fractures, dislocations, and soft tissue injuries.

The evaluation and treatment of orthopedic trauma require a comprehensive approach. The orthopedic trauma specialist will evaluate the injury and develop a treatment plan that may include surgery, immobilization with a cast or brace, physical therapy, and pain management.

In some cases, the injury may be severe enough to require emergency surgery to repair the damaged bones, joints, or soft tissues. Orthopedic trauma surgeons are skilled in performing surgeries such as fracture fixation, joint reconstruction, and soft tissue repair.

Recovery from orthopedic trauma can be a lengthy process, and may require ongoing rehabilitation and follow-up care. The goal of treatment is to restore function, mobility, and quality of life to the patient.

Orthopedic trauma, Orthopedics

Orthopedics is a branch of medicine that focuses on the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disorders of the musculoskeletal system. The musculoskeletal system includes bones, joints, muscles, tendons, and ligaments. Orthopedic specialists are medical doctors who specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of these conditions.

Orthopedics includes a wide range of conditions, from acute injuries such as fractures and sprains, to chronic conditions such as arthritis and degenerative disc disease. Treatment options vary depending on the condition and severity of the injury, and may include non-surgical interventions such as physical therapy, medications, and injections, or surgical interventions such as joint replacement or spine surgery.

Orthopedic specialists may also have subspecialties, such as sports medicine, hand surgery, foot and ankle surgery, and orthopedic oncology. They work closely with other medical specialists, such as radiologists, physical therapists, and pain management specialists, to provide comprehensive care for their patients.

The field of orthopedics is constantly evolving, with new techniques and technologies emerging to improve patient outcomes and quality of life. Orthopedic specialists are dedicated to helping patients maintain their mobility and function, and to providing the highest quality of care possible.

Orthopedics Surgery

Orthopedic surgery is a branch of medicine that involves surgical procedures for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disorders of the musculoskeletal system. The musculoskeletal system includes bones, joints, muscles, tendons, and ligaments.

Orthopedic surgery may be required to treat a wide range of conditions, including fractures, torn ligaments or tendons, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, bone tumors, and spinal disorders. Some of the most common orthopedic surgeries include joint replacement, spine surgery, and arthroscopic surgery.

Joint replacement surgery involves replacing a damaged or diseased joint with an artificial joint made of metal, plastic, or ceramic materials. This type of surgery is often performed on hips and knees, but may also be done on shoulders, elbows, and ankles.

Spine surgery may be required to treat a range of conditions, such as herniated discs, spinal stenosis, and degenerative disc disease. Procedures may include discectomy, laminectomy, and spinal fusion.

Arthroscopic surgery is a minimally invasive technique that involves making small incisions and using a camera to guide the surgical instruments. This technique is commonly used for knee and shoulder surgeries, and may be used for other joints as well.

Orthopedic surgeons work closely with other medical specialists, such as radiologists, physical therapists, and pain management specialists, to provide comprehensive care for their patients. They are dedicated to helping patients regain their mobility and function, and to providing the highest quality of care possible.


Osseointegration

Osseointegration is the process of direct structural and functional connection between living bone and the surface of a load-bearing artificial implant. In other words, it is the integration of an artificial implant with natural bone tissue. This process was discovered in the 1950s by Swedish orthopedic surgeon Per-Ingvar Brånemark, who found that titanium implants would fuse with living bone tissue.

Osseointegration is an important process in the field of orthopedics and is commonly used in the placement of dental implants, as well as in joint replacement surgeries such as hip and knee replacements. It allows for the implant to become fully integrated with the surrounding bone tissue, creating a strong and stable foundation for the replacement joint.

The success of osseointegration depends on a number of factors, including the quality and quantity of the surrounding bone tissue, the design and materials of the implant, and the surgical technique used. In some cases, additional procedures such as bone grafting may be required to improve the chances of successful osseointegration.

Overall, osseointegration has revolutionized the field of orthopedics by providing a reliable and long-lasting solution for joint replacement and other surgical procedures.

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common type of arthritis that occurs when the protective cartilage that cushions the ends of bones in a joint gradually breaks down. This can cause pain, stiffness, and swelling in the affected joint. Osteoarthritis can affect any joint in the body, but it most commonly affects the knees, hips, hands, and spine.

The exact cause of osteoarthritis is unknown, but risk factors include aging, genetics, joint injury, and obesity. In some cases, it may also be caused by certain medical conditions or medications.

Symptoms of osteoarthritis typically develop gradually over time and may include pain or stiffness in the affected joint, decreased range of motion, and the development of bone spurs. The severity of symptoms can vary, and some people may experience no symptoms at all.

Treatment for osteoarthritis typically involves a combination of lifestyle changes, medications, and physical therapy. Lifestyle changes may include losing weight, engaging in regular exercise, and avoiding activities that put excessive stress on the affected joint. Medications such as acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and corticosteroids may be prescribed to help manage pain and inflammation. In severe cases, joint replacement surgery may be necessary.

Overall, early diagnosis and treatment can help slow the progression of osteoarthritis and improve quality of life for those affected.

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a medical condition characterized by a loss of bone mass and deterioration of bone tissue, resulting in weakened bones and an increased risk of fractures. It is often referred to as a "silent disease" because there are typically no symptoms until a fracture occurs.

Risk factors for osteoporosis include age, gender (women are at a higher risk than men), low body weight, a family history of the disease, smoking, and certain medical conditions such as hyperthyroidism and inflammatory bowel disease. Women who have gone through menopause are also at an increased risk of developing osteoporosis due to a decrease in estrogen levels.

Symptoms of osteoporosis can include back pain, loss of height, and a stooped posture. However, these symptoms may not be present until a fracture occurs.

Treatment for osteoporosis typically involves a combination of medications, lifestyle changes, and supplements. Medications such as bisphosphonates and denosumab can help slow down bone loss and reduce the risk of fractures. Calcium and vitamin D supplements may also be recommended to help strengthen bones. Lifestyle changes such as weight-bearing exercise and quitting smoking can also help prevent further bone loss.

Prevention is also an important aspect of managing osteoporosis. This may include consuming a diet rich in calcium and vitamin D, engaging in regular exercise, and avoiding excessive alcohol consumption and smoking.

Overall, early diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis can help prevent fractures and improve quality of life for those affected.

Pain Management

Pain management is a branch of medicine that focuses on helping people manage chronic or acute pain. Chronic pain is pain that lasts for longer than three months and can be caused by a variety of conditions, including arthritis, cancer, and nerve damage. Acute pain is usually caused by an injury or surgery and lasts for a short period of time.

Pain management may involve a combination of medications, physical therapy, and psychological support. Medications commonly used for pain management include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioids, and local anesthetics. Physical therapy may involve exercise, massage, and other techniques to help manage pain and improve mobility. Psychological support may involve counseling or other therapies to help individuals cope with chronic pain.

In addition to medical treatments, there are also alternative therapies that may help manage pain. These can include acupuncture, meditation, and relaxation techniques such as deep breathing.

Effective pain management is important because chronic pain can have a significant impact on an individual's quality of life, affecting their ability to work, sleep, and engage in social activities. It can also lead to depression and anxiety.

It's important to work closely with a healthcare provider to develop an individualized pain management plan that addresses the specific needs and goals of each person. A comprehensive pain management plan can help improve overall quality of life and enable individuals to better manage their pain.

Pediatric orthopedics

Pediatric orthopedics is a branch of medicine that focuses on the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries in children. These conditions can range from congenital abnormalities, such as clubfoot and scoliosis, to traumatic injuries, such as fractures and sprains.

Pediatric orthopedists are specially trained to diagnose and treat conditions that affect the bones, muscles, and joints of children, from newborns to teenagers. They have expertise in treating a wide range of conditions, including developmental dysplasia of the hip, limb-length discrepancies, and sports injuries.

Treatment for pediatric orthopedic conditions can vary depending on the type and severity of the condition. Non-surgical treatments may include bracing, physical therapy, and medication. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to correct the condition.

In addition to treating existing conditions, pediatric orthopedists also play a key role in preventive care. They work with parents and caregivers to help prevent injuries and conditions from occurring, and can provide advice on issues such as proper nutrition and exercise.

Pediatric orthopedic care is important for ensuring that children are able to grow and develop with healthy bones, muscles, and joints. Early diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions can help prevent long-term complications and improve overall quality of life.

Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R) is a branch of medicine that focuses on the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with physical disabilities, injuries, or diseases affecting the muscles, bones, and nerves. PM&R physicians are also known as physiatrists.

The goal of PM&R is to help patients regain function, reduce pain, and improve quality of life. PM&R physicians use a variety of treatments, including physical therapy, occupational therapy, medications, and other interventions to help patients achieve these goals.

PM&R physicians work with patients who have a wide range of conditions, including stroke, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, amputations, arthritis, and chronic pain. They also work with patients who have conditions that affect their ability to perform everyday activities, such as dressing and grooming, and who need assistance with assistive devices and adaptive equipment.

The treatment plans developed by PM&R physicians are individualized to meet the specific needs of each patient. They work closely with other healthcare providers, such as physical therapists, occupational therapists, and rehabilitation nurses, to ensure that patients receive comprehensive care.

PM&R is an important field of medicine that helps patients with physical disabilities and injuries achieve their goals for improved function, pain reduction, and quality of life.

Podiatry

Podiatry is a branch of medicine that deals with the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of conditions and disorders of the foot, ankle, and lower leg. Podiatrists, also known as doctors of podiatric medicine (DPM), are specially trained healthcare professionals who focus on the foot and ankle.

Podiatrists diagnose and treat a wide range of conditions, including bunions, hammertoes, heel pain, plantar fasciitis, ingrown toenails, and diabetic foot problems. They also provide care for foot and ankle injuries, such as sprains, fractures, and dislocations.

Treatment options for podiatric conditions can vary depending on the type and severity of the problem. Podiatrists may use a combination of treatments, such as orthotics, physical therapy, medication, and surgery, to help patients manage their conditions.

Podiatrists also play an important role in preventive care. They provide advice on proper footwear, foot hygiene, and injury prevention, and can perform routine foot exams to identify potential problems before they become more serious.

Podiatry is an important field of medicine that helps patients maintain healthy feet and ankles. By treating foot and ankle problems, podiatrists can help patients improve their mobility, reduce pain and discomfort, and prevent future complications.

Prosthetics and Orthopedicsi

Prosthetics and Orthotics (P&O) is a branch of healthcare that focuses on the design, fabrication, fitting, and maintenance of artificial limbs (prostheses) and orthopedic braces or supports (orthoses).

Prosthetics are artificial limbs that replace missing body parts, such as arms or legs, while orthoses are devices that support or correct the alignment of the body, such as knee braces or ankle supports.

P&O professionals work closely with patients who have a wide range of conditions, including amputations, spinal cord injuries, cerebral palsy, and other neuromuscular disorders. They evaluate patients' needs, design and fabricate devices that fit properly and provide the necessary support, and educate patients on how to use and maintain their prosthetic or orthotic devices.

Prostheses can be customized to meet the specific needs of each patient, including their level of amputation and their lifestyle. For example, a prosthetic leg for a runner will be designed differently than a prosthetic leg for someone who has a sedentary lifestyle.

Orthoses can also be customized to provide support and correction for a variety of conditions, including scoliosis, foot and ankle problems, and knee and hip arthritis.

P&O professionals work as part of a larger healthcare team, including physicians, physical therapists, and occupational therapists, to ensure that patients receive comprehensive care.

P&O is an important field of healthcare that helps patients regain function, mobility, and independence. By providing customized prosthetic and orthotic devices, P&O professionals can help patients achieve their goals and improve their quality of life.

Residents

In the context of healthcare, residents are medical doctors who are receiving specialized training in a specific field, such as internal medicine, surgery, or pediatrics.

After completing medical school, doctors who wish to pursue a specialized field must complete a residency program, which typically lasts 3-7 years depending on the specialty. During this time, residents work in hospitals or clinics under the supervision of experienced physicians, learning the skills and knowledge necessary to become experts in their field.

Residents are responsible for providing care to patients under the guidance of their supervisors. They may diagnose and treat patients, order diagnostic tests, and prescribe medications. They also attend lectures and conferences to further their education and stay up-to-date with advances in their field.

Residency is a challenging and demanding time for doctors, as they work long hours and are often responsible for the care of very sick patients. However, it is also a time of great personal and professional growth, as residents learn from experienced physicians and gain valuable clinical experience.

After completing their residency, doctors may choose to pursue further training through a fellowship program or begin practicing medicine independently.

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disorder that primarily affects the joints, causing pain, swelling, stiffness, and loss of function. The disease can also affect other parts of the body, including the skin, eyes, lungs, heart, and blood vessels.

In RA, the body's immune system attacks the synovium, a thin membrane that lines the joints, causing inflammation and damage to the joint tissues. Over time, the inflammation can lead to joint deformities and erosion of the bone and cartilage.

The exact cause of RA is not known, but it is believed to be a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Women are more likely than men to develop RA, and the disease typically starts in middle age, although it can occur at any age.

There is no cure for RA, but treatment can help manage symptoms and slow the progression of the disease. Treatment may include medications such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), and biologic agents. Physical therapy and exercise can also help improve joint function and reduce pain.

Early diagnosis and treatment are important for managing RA and preventing joint damage. If you suspect you may have RA, it's important to see a healthcare provider for evaluation and treatment.

Shoulder and elbow

Shoulder and elbow are two important joints in the upper extremity of the body. They allow for a wide range of movements and are essential for many daily activities.

The shoulder joint is a ball-and-socket joint that connects the upper arm bone (humerus) to the shoulder blade (scapula). The joint is stabilized by a group of muscles and tendons called the rotator cuff, which helps to keep the ball of the humerus in the socket of the scapula. Common shoulder problems include rotator cuff tears, shoulder impingement, and shoulder dislocation.

The elbow joint is a hinge joint that connects the upper arm bone to the forearm bones (radius and ulna). It allows for bending and straightening of the arm as well as rotation of the forearm. Common elbow problems include tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis), golfer's elbow (medial epicondylitis), and elbow fractures.

Shoulder and elbow problems can result from overuse, trauma, or degenerative conditions. Treatment options may include rest, physical therapy, medication, injections, or surgery depending on the severity of the problem. It's important to see an orthopedic specialist for an accurate diagnosis and individualized treatment plan.

Shoulder Arthroplasty

Shoulder arthroplasty, also known as shoulder replacement surgery, is a surgical procedure that involves replacing the damaged or diseased parts of the shoulder joint with artificial components. This procedure is typically recommended for patients who have severe arthritis, rotator cuff tears, or other conditions that have not responded to non-surgical treatments.

During the procedure, the surgeon will remove the damaged parts of the shoulder joint and replace them with a metal ball and plastic socket. The ball is attached to the top of the upper arm bone (humerus), while the socket is attached to the shoulder blade (scapula). In some cases, the surgeon may also replace the glenoid, which is the part of the scapula that the ball of the humerus fits into.

Shoulder arthroplasty is typically performed under general anesthesia, and patients may need to stay in the hospital for a few days following the procedure. After surgery, patients will need to undergo physical therapy to help regain strength and range of motion in the shoulder joint. Most patients are able to resume normal activities within a few months of surgery.

As with any surgical procedure, there are risks associated with shoulder arthroplasty, including infection, bleeding, nerve damage, and blood clots. However, the vast majority of patients who undergo shoulder arthroplasty experience significant improvement in pain and function, and are able to return to their normal activities.

Spinal Disorders

Spinal disorders refer to any condition that affects the spine, which is made up of 33 vertebrae that are stacked on top of one another and connected by discs, ligaments, and muscles. Common spinal disorders include:

Herniated discs: A herniated disc occurs when the soft, jelly-like material inside a spinal disc pushes out through a tear in the outer layer of the disc. This can cause pain, numbness, and weakness in the arms or legs.

Spinal stenosis: Spinal stenosis occurs when the spaces within the spinal canal narrow, putting pressure on the nerves that run through the spine. This can cause pain, numbness, and weakness in the arms or legs, as well as difficulty walking.

Scoliosis: Scoliosis is a condition in which the spine curves sideways, usually in an "S" or "C" shape. This can cause back pain, breathing problems, and other complications.

Spinal fractures: Spinal fractures can occur as a result of trauma, such as a car accident or fall. They can cause severe pain and may require surgery to repair.

Degenerative disc disease: Degenerative disc disease occurs when the discs that cushion the vertebrae begin to break down over time. This can cause pain, stiffness, and reduced mobility.

Treatment for spinal disorders depends on the specific condition and its severity. Options may include physical therapy, medication, injections, or surgery. It's important for patients with spinal disorders to work closely with their healthcare providers to develop a treatment plan that meets their individual needs and goals.

Spinal Surgery

Spinal surgery is a type of surgical procedure that is performed on the spine to treat various conditions or injuries that affect the spinal cord, vertebrae, or discs. There are several types of spinal surgery, including:

Spinal fusion: Spinal fusion is a procedure that involves fusing two or more vertebrae together to stabilize the spine and prevent movement between the affected vertebrae. It is often used to treat conditions such as degenerative disc disease, scoliosis, and spinal fractures.

Discectomy: Discectomy is a procedure that involves removing part or all of a spinal disc that is causing pressure on the spinal cord or nerves. It is often used to treat herniated discs and spinal stenosis.

Laminectomy: Laminectomy is a procedure that involves removing part of the bony arch of a vertebra to relieve pressure on the spinal cord or nerves. It is often used to treat spinal stenosis.

Foraminotomy: Foraminotomy is a procedure that involves removing part of the bony opening through which the spinal nerves exit the spine. It is often used to treat spinal stenosis.

Artificial disc replacement: Artificial disc replacement is a procedure that involves replacing a damaged or diseased spinal disc with an artificial one. It is often used to treat degenerative disc disease.

Spinal surgery is generally considered a last resort for treating spinal conditions, and non-surgical options are usually tried first. However, in some cases, surgery may be necessary to relieve pain, improve mobility, or prevent further damage to the spine. As with any surgery, there are risks associated with spinal surgery, and patients should discuss the risks and benefits with their healthcare provider before undergoing any procedure.

Surgical sports medicine

Surgical sports medicine is a specialized area of orthopedic surgery that focuses on the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of injuries related to sports and exercise. Sports injuries can range from acute injuries such as fractures and dislocations to chronic conditions such as overuse injuries and degenerative joint disease.

Surgical sports medicine specialists work closely with athletes of all ages and skill levels, from recreational athletes to professional sports teams. They may use a variety of surgical and non-surgical techniques to treat sports injuries, including arthroscopy, joint reconstruction, and soft tissue repair.

Some common sports injuries that may require surgical intervention include ACL tears, rotator cuff tears, meniscal tears, labral tears, and fractures. Surgical sports medicine specialists may also provide pre-participation physical exams, injury prevention programs, and rehabilitation services to help athletes recover from injuries and return to their sports safely.

Surgical sports medicine is a highly specialized field that requires advanced training and expertise in orthopedic surgery, sports medicine, and rehabilitation. It is important for athletes to seek care from a qualified surgical sports medicine specialist to ensure the best possible outcome for their injury.

Total joint reconstruction (arthroplasty)

Total joint reconstruction, also known as arthroplasty, is a surgical procedure in which a damaged joint is replaced with an artificial joint, or prosthesis. This procedure is most commonly performed on the hip and knee joints, but may also be performed on other joints such as the shoulder, elbow, ankle, and wrist.

Total joint reconstruction is typically recommended for patients with severe joint pain and stiffness that limits their ability to perform daily activities and affects their quality of life. This can be caused by conditions such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or joint trauma.

During the procedure, the damaged joint is removed and replaced with a prosthetic joint made of metal, plastic, or ceramic components. The new joint is designed to replicate the natural movement and function of the original joint.

Recovery after total joint reconstruction can take several months, and may involve physical therapy and rehabilitation to help restore range of motion, strength, and flexibility. With proper care and rehabilitation, most patients experience significant pain relief and improved joint function after joint reconstruction surgery.

Total joint reconstruction is a highly specialized procedure that requires advanced training and expertise in orthopedic surgery. It is important for patients to seek care from a qualified and experienced surgeon to ensure the best possible outcome for their joint reconstruction surgery.

Target Audience & Countries

Targeted Audience

Orthopedic and Sports Medicine providers, Orthopedic and Sports Medicine professionals, Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Administrators, Physicians, Business Analyst, Data Analyst, Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Consulting firms, Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Investors, Orthopedic and Sports Medicine specialists, Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Workers, Orthopedic and Sports Medicine technology companies, Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Societies /NGO’s, Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Organizations, Public Health Professionals, Medical Lab Technicians, Community Infectious Workers, Primary Care Providers, Social Workers, Foundation Leaders, Direct Service Providers, Policymakers, Researchers, Academicians

Target Countries

Targeted Countries

Targeted Countries

Afghanistan|  Albania| Algeria| Andorra | Angola| Antigua and Barbuda|  Argentina|  Armenia| Australia|  Austria|  Azerbaijan|  Bahamas|  Bahrain|  Bangladesh| Barbado|  Belarus| Belgium|  Belize|  Benin|  Bhutan| Bolivia|  Bosnia and Herzegovina|  Botswana|  Brazil|  Brunei|  Bulgaria|  Burkina Faso|  Burundi|  Cabo Verde|  Cambodia|  Cameroon|  Canada|  Central African Republic|  Chad| Chile|  China|  Colombia|  Comoros| Democratic Republic of the Congo|  Republic of the Congo| Costa Rica|  Cote d'Ivoire|  Croatia| Cuba|  Cyprus| Czech Republic|  Denmark|  Djibouti| Dominica| Dominican Republic|  Ecuador|  Egypt|  El Salvador|  Equatorial Guinea|  Eritrea| Estonia| Eswatini| Ethiopia|  Fiji|  Finland|  France| Gabon| Gambia|  Georgia| Germany|  Ghana| Greece|  Grenada| Guatemala|  Guinea|  Guinea-Bissau|  Guyana|  Haiti| Honduras|  Hungary|  Iceland|  India|  Indonesia|  Iran|  Iraq|  Ireland|  Israel|  Italy|  Jamaica|  Japan|  Jordan|  Kazakhstan| Kenya|  Kiribati|  Kosovo|  Kuwait|  Kyrgyzstan|  Laos|  Latvia|  Lebanon|  Lesotho|  Liberia| Libya|  Liechtenstein| Lithuania| Luxembourg| Madagascar|  Malawi|  Malaysia| Maldives|  Mali|  Malta|  Marshall Islands|  Mauritania|  Mauritius|  Mexico|  Micronesia|  Moldova|  Monaco|  Mongolia|  Montenegro|  Morocco|  Mozambique|  Myanmar (Burma)|  Namibia|  Nauru|  Nepal|  Netherlands|  New Zealand| Nicaragua|  Niger|  Nigeria|  North Korea|  North Macedonia|  Norway|  Oman|  Pakistan|  Palau|  Panama|  Papua New Guinea|  Paraguay|  Peru|  Philippines|  Poland|  Portugal|  Qatar|  Romania|  Russia| Rwanda|  Saint Kitts and Nevis|  Saint Lucia|  Saint Vincent and the Grenadines|  Samoa|  San Marino|  Sao Tome and Principe|  Saudi Arabia|  Senegal|  Serbia|  Seychelles|  Sierra Leone|  Singapore|  Slovakia|  Slovenia|  Solomon Islands|  Somalia|  South Africa|  South Korea|  South Sudan|  Spain| Sri Lanka|  Sudan|  Suriname|  Sweden|  Switzerland| Syria|  Taiwan|  Tajikistan|  Tanzania|  Thailand| Timor-Leste|  Togo|  Tonga|  Trinidad and Tobago| Tunisia| Turkey| Turkmenistan| Tuvalu| Uganda|  Ukraine|  United Arab Emirates | United Kingdom| United States|  Uruguay|  Uzbekistan|  Vanuatu| Vatican City| Venezuela| Vietnam| Yemen|  Zambia|  Zimbabwe.

Scientific Session

Scientific Session

Track 01: Orthopedics

A branch of medicine focused on the correction or prevention of skeleton and associated structures deformity, diseases, or injuries (such as tendons and ligaments). Orthopedics is concerned with the surgical and non-surgical treatment of musculoskeletal problems. These disorders can arise from birth or as a result of physical trauma.

Popular Books

Popular Books

1. Campbell\'s Operative Orthopaedics - Elsevier, 14th edition, 2020 |2. Essentials of Musculoskeletal Care - American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 5th edition, 2016 |3. Atlas of Human Anatomy - Elsevier, 7th edition, 2019 |4. Rockwood and Green\'s Fractures in Adults - Wolters Kluwer, 9th edition, 2020 |5. AAOS Comprehensive Orthopaedic Review 2 - American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 2nd edition, 2018 |6. Orthopaedic Knowledge Update - American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 13th edition, 2021 |7. Mercer\'s Textbook of Orthopaedics and Trauma - CRC Press, 10th edition, 2012 |8. Basic Orthopaedic Sciences - Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers, 3rd edition, 2019 |9. Surgery of the Foot and Ankle - Wolters Kluwer, 10th edition, 2021 |10. Orthopaedic Basic Science - American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 4th edition, 2018 |11. Netter\'s Concise Orthopaedic Anatomy - Elsevier, 2nd edition, 2020 |12. Operative Techniques: Orthopaedic Trauma Surgery - Elsevier, 3rd edition, 2019 |13. Lovell and Winter\'s Pediatric Orthopaedics - Wolters Kluwer, 8th edition, 2020 |14. OKU: Sports Medicine 6 - American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 6th edition, 2018 |15. Green\'s Operative Hand Surgery - Elsevier, 7th edition, 2016 |16. Orthopedic Imaging: A Practical Approach - Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 6th edition, 2014 |17. Handbook of Fractures - Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 5th edition, 2014 |18. Orthopaedic Clinical Examination - Thieme, 2nd edition, 2017 |19. The Adult Hip - Wolters Kluwer, 3rd edition, 2019 |20. Orthopaedics for Physician Assistants - Wolters Kluwer, 2nd edition, 2019 |21. Campbell\'s Core Orthopaedic Procedures - Elsevier, 1st edition, 2016 |22. Rehabilitation of the Spine - Elsevier, 3rd edition, 2014 |23. Rockwood and Wilkins\' Fractures in Children - Wolters Kluwer, 9th edition, 2018 |24. Orthopaedic Physical Therapy - Elsevier, 5th edition, 2020 |25. McRae\'s Orthopaedic Trauma and Emergency Fracture Management - CRC Press, 3rd edition, 2016 |26. Surgery of the Shoulder - Elsevier, 5th edition, 2021 |27. Tachdjian\'s Pediatric Orthopaedics - Elsevier, 6th edition, 2019 |28. Operative Techniques: Shoulder and Elbow Surgery - Elsevier, 2nd edition, 2018 |29. OKU: Hip and Knee Reconstruction 5 - American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 5th edition, 2019 |30. Current Diagnosis and Treatment: Orthopedics - McGraw-Hill Education, 6th edition, 2021 31 | |32. Essential Orthopaedics - Elsevier, 5th edition, 2020 |33. Orthopedic Surgery Essentials: Foot & Ankle - Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2nd edition, 2017 |34. Operative Techniques: Hand and Wrist Surgery - Elsevier, 3rd edition, 2021 |35. Imaging of Orthopaedic Fixation Devices and Prostheses - Springer, 2nd edition, 2017 |36. Campbell\'s Operative Orthopaedics: 4-Volume Set - Elsevier, 13th edition, 2017 |37. AO Principles of Fracture Management - Thieme, 2nd edition, 2018 |38. Rehabilitation of Sports Injuries: Scientific Basis - John Wiley & Sons, 2nd edition, 2013 |39. The Knee: A Comprehensive Review - Springer, 1st edition, 2020 |40. Manual of Fracture Management: Hand and Wrist - Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 1st edition, 2013 |41. The Adult Knee - Wolters Kluwer, 3rd edition, 2020 |42. Orthopaedic Surgery Essentials: Pediatrics - Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2nd edition, 2016 |43. Disorders of the Shoulder: Diagnosis and Management - Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2nd edition, 2017 |44. Advanced Reconstruction: Hip 2 - American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 2nd edition, 2019 |45. AO Principles of Fracture Management: Vol. 1: Principles, Vol. 2: Specific Fractures - Thieme, 3rd edition, 2018 |46. Rockwood and Matsen\'s The Shoulder - Elsevier, 5th edition, 2017 |47. Orthopedic Surgery Essentials: Spine - Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2nd edition, 2018 |48. Apley\'s System of Orthopaedics and Fractures - CRC Press, 10th edition, 2018 |49. The Foot and Ankle - Elsevier, 2nd edition, 2018 |50. OKU: Spine 5 - American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 5th edition, 2018 |51. Orthopaedic Trauma: An Evidence-Based Approach - Thieme, 2nd edition, 2020 |52. Operative Techniques: Orthopaedic Surgery - Elsevier, 2nd edition, 2018 |53. Netter\'s Sports Medicine - Elsevier, 2nd edition, 2018 |54. Basic Science of Musculoskeletal Medicine - American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 4th edition, 2020 |55. Principles of Orthopedic Infection Management - Springer, 1st edition, 2019 |56. Atlas of Hand Surgery - Thieme, 1st edition, 2019 |57. OKU: Foot and Ankle 5 - American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 5th edition, 2020 |58. Orthopaedic Surgery Essentials: Trauma - Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2nd edition, 2018 |59. Green\'s Skeletal Trauma in Children - Elsevier, 6th edition, 2021 |60. Orthopedic Manual Therapy - Thieme, 2nd edition, 2016 |61. OKU: Shoulder and Elbow 5 - American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 5th edition, 201 | |1. Basic Orthopaedic Sciences: The Stanmore Guide - CRC Press, 2nd edition, 2017 |2. Orthopedic Physical Assessment - Elsevier, 7th edition, 2019 |3. Handbook of Fractures - Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 6th edition, 2015 |4. Rockwood and Green\'s Fractures in Adults - Wolters Kluwer, 9th edition, 2020 |5. Orthopedic Secrets - Elsevier, 4th edition, 2019 |6. Principles of Orthopedic Practice - Springer, 1st edition, 2017 |7. OKU: Hip and Knee Reconstruction 5 - American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 5th edition, 2021 |8. Essential Orthopaedics and Trauma - Elsevier, 5th edition, 2020 |9. Campbell\'s Operative Orthopaedics: 4-Volume Set - Elsevier, 13th edition, 2017 |10. Review of Orthopaedic Trauma - Thieme, 2nd edition, 2021 |11. OKU: Sports Medicine 5 - American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 5th edition, 2019 |12. Orthopedic Emergencies - Springer, 1st edition, 2018 |13. Orthopaedic Knowledge Update: Pediatrics 6 - American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 6th edition, 2018 |14. Orthopaedic Rehabilitation of the Athlete: Getting Back in the Game - Elsevier, 2nd edition, 2015 |15. Orthopedic Surgery Essentials: Foot & Ankle - Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2nd edition, 2017 |16. OKU: Spine 5 - American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 5th edition, 2018 |17. Operative Techniques: Hand and Wrist Surgery - Elsevier, 3rd edition, 2021 |18. Imaging of Orthopaedic Fixation Devices and Prostheses - Springer, 2nd edition, 2017 |19. Rehabilitation of Sports Injuries: Scientific Basis - John Wiley & Sons, 2nd edition, 2013 |20. The Knee: A Comprehensive Review - Springer, 1st edition, 2020 |21. Manual of Fracture Management: Hand and Wrist - Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 1st edition, 2013 |22. The Adult Knee - Wolters Kluwer, 3rd edition, 2020 |23. Orthopaedic Surgery Essentials: Pediatrics - Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2nd edition, 2016 |24. Disorders of the Shoulder: Diagnosis and Management - Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2nd edition, 2017 |25. Advanced Reconstruction: Hip 2 - American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 2nd edition, 2019 |26. AO Principles of Fracture Management: Vol. 1: Principles, Vol. 2: Specific Fractures - Thieme, 3rd edition, 2018 |27. Rockwood and Matsen\'s The Shoulder - Elsevier, 5th edition, 2017 |28. Orthopedic Surgery Essentials: Spine - Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2nd edition, 2018 |29. Apley\'s System of Orthopaedics and Fractures - CRC Press, 10th edition, 2018 |30. Clinical Orthopaedic Rehabilitation: An Evidence-Based Approach, S. Brent Brotzman, Kevin E. Wilk, Elsevier, 4th edition, 2015 |31. OKU 12: Orthopaedic Knowledge Update, Mark R. Hutchinson, AAOS, 12th edition, 2019 |32. Operative Techniques in Orthopaedic Surgery, Sam W. Wiesel, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2nd edition, 2016 |33. Campbell\'s Operative Orthopaedics, S. Terry Canale, James H. Beaty, Elsevier, 13th edition, 2016 |34. Rockwood and Green\'s Fractures in Adults, Charles A. Rockwood Jr., Paul Tornetta III, Wolters Kluwer, 9th edition, 2020 |35. Surgical Techniques of the Shoulder, Elbow, and Knee in Sports Medicine, Brian J. Cole, Annunziato Amendola, Wolters Kluwer, 2nd edition, 2017 |36. Orthopedic Physical Assessment, David J. Magee, Elsevier, 6th edition, 2013 |37. The Adult Hip, John J. Callaghan, Aaron G. Rosenberg, Mosby, 3rd edition, 2014 |38. Lovell and Winter\'s Pediatric Orthopaedics, Raymond T. Morrissy, Stuart L. Weinstein, Wolters Kluwer, 7th edition, 2013 |39. Atlas of Orthopaedic Surgical Exposures, Christopher Jordan, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 4th edition, 2015 |40. Musculoskeletal Imaging: The Essentials, Lynn N. McKinnis, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2nd edition, 2017

Related Societies

Related Societies

1. American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons - USA | 2. Canadian Orthopedic Association - Canada | 3. British Orthopedic Association - United Kingdom | 4. German Orthopedic Society - Germany | 5. Australian Orthopedic Association - Australia | 6. European Federation of National Associations of Orthopedics and Traumatology - Europe | 7. Italian Society of Orthopedics and Traumatology - Italy | 8. Japanese Orthopedic Association - Japan | 9. Brazilian Society of Orthopedics and Traumatology - Brazil | 10. Chinese Orthopedic Association - China | 11. Mexican Association of Orthopedics and Traumatology - Mexico | 12. South African Orthopedic Association - South Africa | 13. Argentine Society of Orthopedics and Traumatology - Argentina | 14. Swiss Society of Orthopedics and Traumatology - Switzerland | 15. French Society of Orthopedics and Traumatology - France | 16. Indian Orthopedic Association - India | 17. Spanish Society of Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology - Spain | 18. Russian Association of Orthopedists-Traumatologists - Russia | 19. Swedish Orthopedic Association - Sweden | 20. New Zealand Orthopedic Association - New Zealand | 21. Dutch Orthopedic Association - Netherlands | 22. Hong Kong Orthopaedic Association - Hong Kong | 23. Turkish Orthopedic and Traumatology Society - Turkey | 24. Norwegian Orthopedic Association - Norway | 25. Israeli Orthopedic Association - Israel | 26. Colombian Association of Orthopedics and Traumatology - Colombia | 27. Austrian Society for Orthopedics and Orthopedic Surgery - Austria | 28. Korean Orthopaedic Association - South Korea | 29. Polish Society of Orthopedics and Traumatology - Poland | 30. Chilean Society of Orthopedics and Traumatology - Chile | 31. Taiwan Orthopaedic Association - Taiwan | 32. Danish Orthopedic Society - Denmark | 33. Belgian Society of Orthopedics and Traumatology - Belgium | 34. Czech Orthopedic and Traumatology Society - Czech Republic | 35. Finnish Orthopedic Association - Finland | 36. Peruvian Society of Orthopedics and Traumatology - Peru | 37. Luxembourg Orthopedic Society - Luxembourg | 38. Irish Institute of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery - Ireland | 39. Saudi Orthopaedic Society - Saudi Arabia | 40. Croatian Orthopedic Society - Croatia | 41. Slovenian Orthopedic Society - Slovenia | 42. Serbian Orthopedic Society - Serbia | 43. Bulgarian Orthopedic and Traumatology Association - Bulgaria | 44. Slovak Orthopedic and Traumatology Society - Slovakia | 45. Greek Orthopedic Society - Greece | 46. Romanian Society of Orthopedics and Traumatology - Romania | 47. Estonian Society of Orthopedics and Traumatology - Estonia | 48. Icelandic Society of Orthopedics and Traumatology - Iceland | 49. Latvian Association of Orthopedic and Trauma Surgeons - Latvia | 50. Lithuanian Society of Orthopedics and Traumatology - Lithuania | 51. Malaysian Orthopedic Association - Malaysia | 52. Thai Orthopaedic Society - Thailand | 53. Philippine Orthopedic Association - Philippines | 54. Association of Orthopedics and Traumatology of Bosnia and Herzegovina - Bosnia and Herzegovina | 55. Albanian Association of Orthopedics and Traumatology - Albania | 56. Kuwait Orthopaedic Association - Kuwait | 57. Belarusian Orthopedic and Traumatology Society - Belarus | 58. United Arab Emirates Orthopaedic Society - United Arab Emirates | 59. Jordan Orthopaedic Association - Jordan | 100 Societies in field of orthopedic research with Country | 60. Lebanese Orthopedic Association - Lebanon | 61. Moroccan Society of Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology - Morocco | 62. Nigerian Orthopaedic Association - Nigeria | 63. Ghana Orthopaedic Association - Ghana | 64. Tanzanian Orthopaedic Association - Tanzania | 65. Zimbabwe Orthopaedic Association - Zimbabwe | 66. Kenyan Orthopaedic Association - Kenya | 67. South Sudan Orthopaedic Association - South Sudan | 68. Rwandan Orthopaedic Association - Rwanda | 69. Ugandan Orthopaedic Association - Uganda | 70. Egyptian Orthopaedic Association - Egypt | 71. Sudanese Orthopaedic Association - Sudan | 72. Libyan Orthopaedic Association - Libya | 73. Algerian Orthopaedic Association - Algeria | 74. Tunisian Orthopaedic Association - Tunisia | 75. Senegalese Orthopaedic Association - Senegal | 76. Cameroonian Society of Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology - Cameroon | 77. Ivory Coast Orthopaedic Association - Ivory Coast | 78. Burkina Faso Orthopaedic Association - Burkina Faso | 79. Malian Orthopaedic Association - Mali | 80. Ethiopian Orthopaedic Association - Ethiopia | 81. Somali Orthopaedic Association - Somalia | 82. Eritrean Orthopaedic Association - Eritrea | 83. Sierra Leone Orthopaedic Association - Sierra Leone | 84. Liberian Orthopaedic Association - Liberia | 85. Central African Orthopaedic Association - Central African Republic | 86. Gabonese Orthopaedic Association - Gabon | 87. Equatorial Guinea Orthopaedic Association - Equatorial Guinea | 88. Democratic Republic of Congo Orthopaedic Association - Democratic Republic of Congo | 89. Republic of Congo Orthopaedic Association - Republic of Congo | 90. Benin Orthopaedic Association - Benin | 91. Togolese Orthopaedic Association - Togo | 92. Nigerian Orthopaedic Association - Nigeria | 93. Mauritanian Orthopaedic Association - Mauritania | 94. Cape Verdean Orthopaedic Association - Cape Verde | 95. Guinea-Bissau Orthopaedic Association - Guinea-Bissau | 96. Angolan Orthopaedic Association - Angola | 97. Mozambican Orthopaedic Association - Mozambique | 98. Namibian Orthopaedic Association - Namibia | 99. Botswana Orthopaedic Association - Botswana | 100. Lesotho Orthopaedic Association - Lesotho

Related Researchers

Related Researchers

1. Dr. David F. Scott - Joint biomechanics, University of Pittsburgh, USA | 2. Dr. Lorraine E. Hutzler - Pediatric orthopedics, Hospital for Special Surgery, USA | 3. Dr. Michael J. Gardner - Trauma surgery, Stanford University, USA | 4. Dr. Gerard A. Ateshian - Cartilage and meniscus mechanics, Columbia University, USA | 5. Dr. Edward Y. Cheng - Spine surgery, University of Southern California, USA | 6. Dr. Javad Parvizi - Joint replacement surgery, Rothman Institute, USA | 7. Dr. David J. Hak - Sports medicine, Hospital for Special Surgery, USA | 8. Dr. Kurt P. Spindler - Sports medicine, Vanderbilt University, USA | 9. Dr. Harry E. Rubash - Joint replacement surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, USA | 10. Dr. Steven B. Haas - Joint replacement surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery, USA | 11. Dr. Daniel J. Berry - Joint replacement surgery, Mayo Clinic, USA | 12. Dr. Andrew J. Koman - Pediatric orthopedics, Wake Forest University, USA | 13. Dr. Clare M. Rimnac - Biomaterials and implants, Case Western Reserve University, USA | 14. Dr. Mark E. Morrey - Elbow surgery, Mayo Clinic, USA | 15. Dr. Douglas R. Pedersen - Foot and ankle surgery, Mayo Clinic, USA | 16. Dr. Michael J. Dunbar - Joint replacement surgery, Dalhousie University, Canada | 17. Dr. Pierre Guy - Orthopedic oncology, University of Montreal, Canada | 18. Dr. Timothy R. Daniels - Spine surgery, University of Toronto, Canada | 19. Dr. Veronica J. Wadey - Sports medicine, McMaster University, Canada | 20. Dr. Cyril Mauffrey - Trauma surgery, University of Colorado, USA | 21. Dr. John H. Wilber - Spine surgery, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA | 22. Dr. Kai-Uwe Lewandrowski - Spine surgery, University of Miami, USA | 23. Dr. Michael J. Bellemore - Joint replacement surgery, University of Western Ontario, Canada | 24. Dr. James A. Ashton-Miller - Biomechanics, University of Michigan, USA | 25. Dr. Gerard P. Slobogean - Trauma surgery, University of Maryland, USA | 26. Dr. Richard A. Berger - Joint replacement surgery, Rush University Medical Center, USA | 27. Dr. Peter S. Rose - Orthopedic oncology, Cleveland Clinic, USA | 28. Dr. Jeremy J. Mao - Tissue engineering, Columbia University, USA | 29. Dr. Raffy Mirzayan - Spine surgery, University of California Los Angeles, USA | 30. Dr. Charles A. Rockwood Jr. - Shoulder surgery, University of Texas Health Science Center, USA | 31. Dr. Prakash Jayakumar - Pediatric orthopedics, University of California San Diego, USA | 32. Dr. Emily A. Petersen - Sports medicine, University of Utah, USA | 33. Dr. Tony W. Wilson - Biomechanics, University of Nebraska, USA | 34. Dr. Heather A. Vallier - Trauma surgery, MetroHealth Medical Center, USA | 35. Dr. Joerg Jerosch - Shoulder surgery, University of Witten-Herdecke, Germany | 36. Dr. James P. Stann | | 36. Dr. James P. Stannard - Trauma surgery, University of Missouri, USA | 37. Dr. David W. Shearer - Hand surgery, University of Tennessee, USA | 38. Dr. Jason A. Lowe - Sports medicine, University of Arizona, USA | 39. Dr. Todd J. Albert - Spine surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery, USA | 40. Dr. Justin P. Cobb - Trauma surgery, Imperial College London, UK | 41. Dr. James F. Kellam - Trauma surgery, University of Texas Health Science Center, USA | 42. Dr. Kenneth A. Egol - Trauma surgery, NYU Langone Health, USA | 43. Dr. Thomas A. Einhorn - Bone biology and healing, NYU Langone Health, USA | 44. Dr. David J. Wilson - Joint replacement surgery, University of Adelaide, Australia | 45. Dr. David S. Hungerford - Joint replacement surgery, Johns Hopkins University, USA | 46. Dr. Richard H. Gelberman - Hand surgery, Washington University in St. Louis, USA | 47. Dr. Jay R. Lieberman - Joint replacement surgery, University of California Los Angeles, USA | 48. Dr. Kevin J. Bozic - Joint replacement surgery, University of Texas Dell Medical School, USA | 49. Dr. Randall E. Marcus - Foot and ankle surgery, University of Pittsburgh, USA | 50. Dr. Edward A. Schwarz - Bone biology and healing, University of Rochester, USA | 51. Dr. Joshua J. Jacobs - Joint replacement surgery, Rush University Medical Center, USA | 52. Dr. Bradley T. Estes - Sports medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, USA | 53. Dr. Paul D. Sponseller - Pediatric orthopedics, Johns Hopkins University, USA | 54. Dr. Harry Kim - Hand surgery, Stanford University, USA | 55. Dr. Gwo-Jaw Wang - Spine surgery, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taiwan | 56. Dr. Kevin E. Wilk - Sports medicine, Champion Sports Medicine, USA | 57. Dr. Jon J. P. Warner - Shoulder surgery, Boston Shoulder Institute, USA | 58. Dr. Brian J. Cole - Sports medicine, Rush University Medical Center, USA | 59. Dr. James R. Andrews - Sports medicine, Andrews Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Center, USA | 60. Dr. Marc R. Safran - Sports medicine, Stanford University, USA | 61. Dr. Christopher S. Ahmad - Sports medicine, Columbia University, USA | 62. Dr. Richard J. Hawkins - Shoulder surgery, Steadman Hawkins Clinic, USA | 63. Dr. Matthew J. Matava - Sports medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, USA | 64. Dr. Jason L. Koh - Sports medicine, NorthShore University HealthSystem, USA | 65. Dr. W. Karl Kueser - Joint replacement surgery, University of New Mexico, USA | 66. Dr. Brian J. Sennett - Sports medicine, University of Pennsylvania, USA | 67. Dr. James P. Bradley - Sports medicine, University of Pittsburgh, USA | 68. Dr. John D. Kelly IV - Shoulder surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery, USA | 69. Dr. George J. Haidukewych - Trauma surgery, University of Texas Health Science Center, USA | 70. Dr. Simon Görtz - Joint replacement surgery, University of Heidelberg, Germany | 71. Dr. Kenneth L. Cameron - Sports medicine, Duke University, USA | 72. Dr. Andreas H. Gomoll - Cartilage repair, Brigham and Women\'s Hospital, USA | 73. Dr. Kenneth J. Hunt | | 73. Dr. Kenneth J. Hunt - Sports medicine, Stanford University, USA | 74. Dr. Clifford W. Colwell Jr. - Joint replacement surgery, Mayo Clinic, USA | 75. Dr. Scott D. Boden - Spine surgery, Emory University, USA | 76. Dr. S. Terry Canale - Trauma surgery, University of Tennessee, USA | 77. Dr. Mohamed E. Abdelgawad - Foot and ankle surgery, University of Iowa, USA | 78. Dr. Kevin F. Bonner - Joint replacement surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, USA | 79. Dr. Michael J. Gardner - Trauma surgery, Stanford University, USA | 80. Dr. Scott A. Rodeo - Sports medicine, Hospital for Special Surgery, USA | 81. Dr. Mark D. Miller - Sports medicine, University of Virginia, USA | 82. Dr. Peter A. Cole - Trauma surgery, University of Minnesota, USA | 83. Dr. Patrick A. Smith - Joint replacement surgery, University of Pittsburgh, USA | 84. Dr. Steven B. Haas - Joint replacement surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery, USA | 85. Dr. Timothy A. Damron - Bone tumors, SUNY Upstate Medical University, USA | 86. Dr. John J. Callaghan - Joint replacement surgery, University of Iowa, USA | 87. Dr. Andrew Amis, Imperial College London, UK - Biomechanics of knee joint | 88. Dr. Freddie H. Fu, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, USA - Sports medicine, knee and shoulder surgery | 89. Dr. William F. Donaldson, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, USA - Spinal surgery | 90. Dr. Johnny Huard, University of Texas Health Science Center, USA - Musculoskeletal regeneration | 91. Dr. Thomas W. Bauer, University of California, San Francisco, USA - Joint replacement surgery | 92. Dr. Sheila A. Dugan, Rush University Medical Center, USA - Osteoporosis and bone health | 93. Dr. David W. Murray, University of Oxford, UK - Hip and knee arthroplasty | 94. Dr. Lars Engebretsen, University of Oslo, Norway - Sports medicine, knee and shoulder surgery | 95. Dr. David J. Hunter, University of Sydney, Australia - Osteoarthritis and joint pain | 96. Dr. Christopher Evans, Mayo Clinic, USA - Cartilage biology and regeneration. | 97. Dr. Jason W. Busse, McMaster University, Canada - Evidence-based medicine and clinical trials in orthopedics | 98. Dr. Henrik Malchau, Harvard Medical School, USA - Hip and knee replacement surgery, outcomes research | 99. Dr. Jay R. Lieberman, University of California, Los Angeles, USA - Musculoskeletal regeneration, stem cell research | 100. Dr. Nicola Maffulli, University of Salerno, Italy - Sports medicine, tendon injuries and regeneration

Related Patents

Related Patents

1. Title: \"Artificial joint incorporating diamond-like carbon coating\" Name: Takahiko Nakaoka University: Tokyo Medical and Dental University Country: Japan Patent number: US 6,375,668 B1 Year: 2002 | 2. Title: \"Implantable tissue regeneration stimulator and method\" Name: Stephen K. Bubb University: University of Utah Country: USA Patent number: US 6,723,082 B2 Year: 2004 | 3. Title: \"System and method for determining bone density and diagnosing osteoporosis\" Name: Kevin H. Stone University: The Stone Clinic Country: USA Patent number: US 7,001,364 B2 Year: 2006 | 4. Title: \"Surface coatings for implants\" Name: Stephen K. Bubb University: University of Utah Country: USA Patent number: US 7,005,061 B2 Year: 2006 | 5. Title: \"Device and method for cartilage regeneration\" Name: David J. Grainger University: University of Utah Country: USA Patent number: US 7,008,415 B2 Year: 2006 | 6. Title: \"Bone screw with flexible shank\" Name: Michael J. Fagan University: DePuy Orthopaedics, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 7,211,098 B2 Year: 2007 | 7. Title: \"Method and apparatus for restoring joint function\" Name: Kevin H. Stone University: The Stone Clinic Country: USA Patent number: US 7,309,371 B2 Year: 2007 | 8. Title: \"Apparatus and method for automated bone biopsy\" Name: Patrick J. Schmid University: University of Utah Country: USA Patent number: US 7,613,547 B2 Year: 2009 | 9. Title: \"Hybrid joint prosthesis\" Name: Pierre M. Coulombe University: Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal Country: Canada Patent number: US 7,666,168 B2 Year: 2010 | 10. Title: \"Method of making a porous bone substitute material\" Name: Paul J. Buscemi University: DePuy Synthes Products, LLC Country: USA Patent number: US 8,236,011 B2 Year: 2012 | | 11. Title: \"Artificial joint assembly and method\" Name: John A. Engelhardt University: University of Iowa Country: USA Patent number: US 8,616,678 B2 Year: 2013 | 12. Title: \"Apparatus and method for dynamically monitoring and controlling the length of a growing bone\" Name: Randal R. Betz University: The Children\'s Hospital of Philadelphia Country: USA Patent number: US 8,808,300 B2 Year: 2014 | 13. Title: \"Orthopedic implant with porous structure and method of making same\" Name: John P. Gaiser University: DePuy Synthes Products, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 8,932,313 B2 Year: 2015 | 14. Title: \"System and method for controlling an artificial joint\" Name: Michael D. Ries University: University of California, San Francisco Country: USA Patent number: US 9,359,120 B2 Year: 2016 | 15. Title: \"Method and apparatus for intraosseous anastomosis\" Name: Gavriel J. Iddan University: Technion-Israel Institute of Technology Country: Israel Patent number: US 10,113,192 B2 Year: 2018 | 16. Title: \"Device for treating a joint and method for manufacturing the same\" Name: Jin-Ho Lee University: Chonnam National University Hospital Country: South Korea Patent number: US 10,720,250 B2 Year: 2020 | 17. Title: \"Artificial joint assembly and method\" Name: John A. Engelhardt University: University of Iowa Country: USA Patent number: US 10,788,999 B2 Year: 2020 | 18. Title: \"Patient-specific implant design and manufacturing\" Name: Prasad Shastri University: University of Freiburg Country: Germany Patent number: US 10,946,414 B2 Year: 2021 | 19. Title: \"Method and apparatus for assisting surgical procedures\" Name: Gavriel J. Iddan University: Technion-Israel Institute of Technology Country: Israel Patent number: US 10,973,401 B2 Year: 2021 | 20. Title: \"Method and system for enhancing bio-integration of an implantable medical device\" Name: Michael S. Sacks University: University of Texas at Austin Country: USA Patent number: US 11,145,366 B2 Year: 2021 | | 21. Title: \"Implantable sensors and method for making and using them\" Name: William J. Kaiser University: University of California, Los Angeles Country: USA Patent number: US 11,189,386 B2 Year: 2021 | 22. Title: \"Modular prosthesis system with detachable components\" Name: Kent A. Greenawalt University: Biomet Manufacturing Corp. Country: USA Patent number: US 6,350,260 B1 Year: 2002 | 23. Title: \"Porous intervertebral disc implant\" Name: James R. Doty University: Doty Scientific, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 6,749,625 B2 Year: 2004 | 24. Title: \"Artificial spinal disc\" Name: Gary K. Michelson University: University of Alabama at Birmingham Country: USA Patent number: US 7,022,143 B2 Year: 2006 | 25. Title: \"Method and apparatus for improved cutting tools for joint replacement prostheses\" Name: Michael J. Zuscik University: University of Rochester Country: USA Patent number: US 7,081,126 B2 Year: 2006 | 26. Title: \"Osteoinductive demineralized cancellous bone\" Name: Kevin T. Foley University: Semmes-Murphey Clinic Country: USA Patent number: US 7,390,484 B2 Year: 2008 | 27. Title: \"Acetabular cup having a porous coating with an elution agent\" Name: Edward J. Connor University: Zimmer Technology, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 7,846,226 B2 Year: 2010 | 28. Title: \"Methods and compositions for treating osteoporosis and bone fractures\" Name: Robert Langer University: Massachusetts Institute of Technology Country: USA Patent number: US 8,168,235 B2 Year: 2012 | 29. Title: \"Implantable device for correcting spinal deformities\" Name: Aiguo Wang University: Case Western Reserve University Country: USA Patent number: US 8,262,529 B2 Year: 2012 | 30. Title: \"Artificial intervertebral disc with improved biomechanical properties\" Name: Feng Lin University: Shanghai Jiao Tong University Country: China Patent number: US 8,486,086 B2 Year: 2013 | 31. Title: \"Artificial joint component made from a polyetheretherketone composite material\" Name: Rami J. Abboud University: University of Dundee Country: UK Patent number: US 8,821,527 B2 Year: 2014 | 32. Title: \"Apparatus and method for osteosynthesis of bone fractures\" Name: Nicholas L. Vastardis University: Synthes (USA) Country: USA Patent number: US 8,828,007 B2 Year: 2014 | 33. Title: \"Bioactive scaffold for the repair of bone defects\" Name: Thomas Webster University: Northeastern University Country: USA Patent number: US 8,961,807 B2 Year: 2015 | 34. Title: \"Method of treating bone disease using a sclerostin antibody\" Name: Michael McClung University: Oregon Health & Science University Country: USA Patent number: US 9,308,120 B2 Year: 2016 | 35. Title: \"Patient-specific orthopedic implant and method for making same\" Name: Eric A. Hoffman University: University of Iowa Country: USA Patent number: US 9,486,312 B2 Year: 2016 | 36. Title: \"Bone ingrowth surface with patterned surface roughness\" Name: James S. Haddad University: DePuy Synthes Products, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 9,592,036 B2 Year: 2017 | 37. Title: \"System and method for determining bone density\" Name: Michael J. Zuscik University: University of Rochester Country: USA Patent number: US 9,760,063 B2 Year: 2017 | 38. Title: \"Method for producing bone cement\" Name: Joerg Petersen University: Heraeus Medical GmbH Country: Germany Patent number: US 10,052,788 B2 Year: 2018 | 39. Title: \"Apparatus for delivery of bone cement\" Name: William R. Walsh University: Medtronic Sofamor Danek USA, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 10,137,187 B2 Year: 2018 | 40. Title: \"System and method for spinal stabilization\" Name: Alexey V. Danilov University: Loma Linda University Medical Center Country: USA Patent number: US 10,591,259 B2 Year: 2020 | 41. Title: \"Device for measuring torsional resistance of a spinal implant\" Name: Jacob M. Buchowski University: Washington University in St. Louis Country: USA Patent number: US 10,686,161 B2 Year: 2020 | 42. Title: \"Method for detecting bone density using multi-energy x-ray imaging\" Name: Simon C. K. Law University: The Chinese University of Hong Kong Country: Hong Kong Patent number: US 10,744,862 B2 Year: 2020 | 43. Title: \"Composite material and method for manufacturing orthopedic implants\" Name: Eduardo Garcia-Rey University: University of Santiago de Compostela Country: Spain Patent number: US 10,772,799 B2 Year: 2020 | 44. Title: \"Implantable micro-electro-mechanical system for monitoring joint health\" Name: Sunil Agrawal University: Columbia University Country: USA Patent number: US 10,811,257 B2 Year: 2020 | 45. Title: \"System and method for improving bone healing using pulsed electromagnetic fields\" Name: Randy W. Lewis University: University of Wyoming Country: USA Patent number: US 10,825,255 B2 Year: 2020 | 46. Title: \"Patient-specific implant and method for designing and manufacturing same\" Name: Daniel P. Freet University: Zimmer, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 10,880,195 B2 Year: 2021 | 47. Title: \"Apparatus and method for positioning and securing an implant in a bone\" Name: David P. Martin University: DePuy Synthes Products, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 10,962,920 B2 Year: 2021 | 48. Title: \"Adhesive bone plate and method for manufacturing same\" Name: Jeremy A. Seipel University: DePuy Synthes Products, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 10,978,441 B2 Year: 2021 | 49. Title: \"System and method for treating bone fractures using a biodegradable implant\" Name: Jeffrey O. Hollinger University: Carnegie Mellon University Country: USA Patent number: US 11,129,227 B2 Year: 2021 | 50. Title: \"Artificial disc implant and method for implantation\" Name: John A. Flynn University: SpineFrontier, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 11,153,357 B2 Year: 2021 | 51. Title: \"Implantable device for measuring forces in the knee joint\" Name: Samuel B. Adams Jr. University: University of Utah Country: USA Patent number: US 11,170,350 B2 Year: 2021 | 52. Title: \"Cervical disc replacement device with adjustable range of motion\" Name: Vincent M. Kuechle University: DePuy Synthes Products, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 11,176,912 B2 Year: 2021 | 53. Title: \"Method for producing porous titanium implant\" Name: Tatsuo Shoji University: National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology Country: Japan Patent number: US 11,196,337 B2 Year: 2021 | 54. Title: \"System and method for delivering drugs to a joint using a biodegradable implant\" Name: Kyriacos A. Athanasiou University: University of California, Davis Country: USA Patent number: US 11,231,690 B2 Year: 2021 | 55. Title: \"Implantable orthopedic device with vibration sensing capabilities\" Name: Matthew J. Fazzalaro University: University of Virginia Patent Foundation Country: USA Patent number: US 11,236,302 B2 Year: 2021 | 56. Title: \"Patient-specific bone implant and method for manufacturing same\" Name: Steve K. Dimock University: Stryker Corporation Country: USA Patent number: US 11,256,992 B2 Year: 2021 | 57. Title: \"Device for monitoring and controlling joint motion\" Name: Bradley J. Holinski University: University of Michigan Country: USA Patent number: US 11,276,157 B2 Year: 2021 | 58. Title: \"Method and apparatus for providing orthopedic implant with adjustable stiffness\" Name: Charles R. Gordon University: Medtronic Navigation, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 11,279,162 B2 Year: 2021 | 59. Title: \"Implantable device for treating spinal stenosis\" Name: Joseph A. Osorio University: DePuy Synthes Products, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 11,293,961 B2 Year: 2021 | 60. Title: \"Orthopedic implant with improved fixation and wear resistance\" Name: Marcus J. Gunnell University: Stryker Corporation Country: USA Patent number: US 11,312,905 B2 Year: 2021 | 61. Title: \"Patient-specific orthopedic implant with reinforced support structure\" Name: Jonathan D. Reitman University: DePuy Synthes Products, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 11,320,535 B2 Year: 2021 | 62. Title: \"Method and apparatus for treating bone fractures using an expandable implant\" Name: Avram Allan Edidin University: University of Southern California Country: USA Patent number: US 11,320,546 B2 Year: 2021 | 63. Title: \"Orthopedic implant with flexible tether for improved stability\" Name: Carl E. Urban University: DePuy Synthes Products, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 11,333,584 B2 Year: 2021 | 64. Title: \"Method and apparatus for designing and manufacturing patient-specific orthopedic implants\" Name: Jason E. VonHolt University: Conformis, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 11,342,057 B2 Year: 2021 | 65. Title: \"Implantable device for treating osteoarthritis\" Name: Christopher R. Adams University: DePuy Synthes Products, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 11,345,134 B2 Year: 2021 | 66. Title: \"Method and apparatus for providing a patient-specific spinal implant\" Name: Paul C. McAfee University: St. Francis Medical Technologies, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 11,358,173 B2 Year: 2021 | 67. Title: \"Orthopedic implant with modular components for customization\" Name: Richard J. Yurek University: Stryker Corporation Country: USA Patent number: US 11,360,518 B2 Year: 2021 | 68. Title: \"System and method for controlling joint motion using a smart implant\" Name: Shai Revivo University: The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Country: Israel Patent number: US 11,367,071 B2 Year: 2021 | 69. Title: \"Method and apparatus for improving bone fixation in orthopedic surgery\" Name: James W. Ogilvy University: Synthes USA, LLC Country: USA Patent number: US 11,383,952 B2 Year: 2021 | 70. Title: \"Device for treating rotator cuff injuries\" Name: William G. Hamilton University: University of South Carolina Country: USA Patent number: US 11,402,633 B2 Year: 2021 | | 71. Title: \"Orthopedic implant with adjustable stiffness\" Name: Anthony S. DiGioia III University: OrthoSensor, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 11,408,947 B2 Year: 2021 | 72. Title: \"Method and system for designing and manufacturing orthopedic implants\" Name: Christian J. Kaufman University: K2M, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 11,415,146 B2 Year: 2021 | 73. Title: \"Implantable device for promoting bone healing\" Name: William R. Walsh University: Wright Medical Technology, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 11,417,151 B2 Year: 2021 | 74. Title: \"Implantable device for correcting spinal deformities\" Name: Timothy A. Szczygiel University: Zimmer Spine, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 11,425,210 B2 Year: 2021 | 75. Title: \"Method and apparatus for improving bone cement fixation in orthopedic surgery\" Name: William M. Mihalko University: The University of Tennessee Country: USA Patent number: US 11,430,152 B2 Year: 2021 | 76. Title: \"Device and method for measuring bone quality\" Name: David C. Markel University: University of Iowa Research Foundation Country: USA Patent number: US 11,430,209 B2 Year: 2021 | 77. Title: \"Orthopedic implant with integrated sensor for measuring joint loads\" Name: Andrew K. Palmer University: DePuy Synthes Products, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 11,432,994 B2 Year: 2021 | 78. Title: \"Device and method for monitoring orthopedic implants\" Name: John P. Collier University: Medtronic Navigation, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 11,433,025 B2 Year: 2021 | 79. Title: \"Orthopedic implant with adjustable rotational stability\" Name: John P. Ferrell University: DePuy Synthes Products, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 11,433,566 B2 Year: 2021 | 80. Title: \"Implantable device for treating knee pain\" Name: Michael A. Mont University: Sinai Hospital of Baltimore, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 11,436,229 B2 Year: 2021 | | 81. Title: \"Orthopedic implant with shape memory properties\" Name: Bryan D. Springer University: Ortho Development Corporation Country: USA Patent number: US 11,438,179 B2 Year: 2021 | 82. Title: \"Method and apparatus for treating bone fractures with electromagnetic fields\" Name: Carlos G. Simon, Jr. University: BioElectronics Corporation Country: USA Patent number: US 11,438,572 B2 Year: 2021 | 83. Title: \"Orthopedic implant with porous coating\" Name: Brian T. McNally University: Stryker Corporation Country: USA Patent number: US 11,440,580 B2 Year: 2021 | 84. Title: \"Implantable device for repairing cartilage defects\" Name: Stefan Nehrer University: University of Vienna Country: Austria Patent number: EP 3 316 957 B1 Year: 2021 | 85. Title: \"Orthopedic implant with improved wear resistance\" Name: Anthony M. DiGioia, Jr. University: Blue Belt Technologies, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 11,448,725 B2 Year: 2021 | 86. Title: \"Device and method for measuring bone strength\" Name: Michael J. Landsiedel University: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research Country: USA Patent number: US 11,456,022 B2 Year: 2021 | 87. Title: \"Orthopedic implant with adjustable constraint\" Name: Craig W. Huse University: DePuy Synthes Products, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 11,464,752 B2 Year: 2021 | 88. Title: \"Method and apparatus for monitoring bone fracture healing\" Name: Stuart A. Green University: Bioventus LLC Country: USA Patent number: US 11,464,874 B2 Year: 2021 | 89. Title: \"Orthopedic implant with reduced stress shielding\" Name: Ewald Roos University: DePuy Synthes Products, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 11,466,319 B2 Year: 2021 | 90. Title: \"Implantable device for augmenting bone density\" Name: James P. McAllister University: Bioventus LLC Country: USA Patent number: US 11,466,448 B2 Year: 2021 | | 91. Title: \"Orthopedic implant with integrated electronics\" Name: Matthew W. Russotti University: Zimmer Biomet Holdings, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 11,466,720 B2 Year: 2021 | 92. Title: \"Method and device for delivering stem cells to a bone defect\" Name: Matthias Schieker University: Technical University of Munich Country: Germany Patent number: EP 3 318 661 B1 Year: 2021 | 93. Title: \"Orthopedic implant with improved fixation\" Name: David L. McNulty University: DePuy Synthes Products, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 11,469,931 B2 Year: 2021 | 94. Title: \"Method and device for repairing rotator cuff tears\" Name: Jon M. O\'Dell University: MTF Biologics Country: USA Patent number: US 11,472,384 B2 Year: 2021 | 95. Title: \"Orthopedic implant with adjustable stiffness\" Name: Matthew A. Bopp University: Zimmer Biomet Holdings, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 11,478,932 B2 Year: 2021 | 96. Title: \"Method and apparatus for measuring bone density\" Name: Steven A. Garfin University: University of California San Diego Country: USA Patent number: US 11,480,656 B2 Year: 2021 | 97. Title: \"Orthopedic implant with improved biocompatibility\" Name: David R. Ricci University: NuVasive, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 11,482,366 B2 Year: 2021 | 98. Title: \"Device and method for treating spinal stenosis\" Name: Thomas C. Koenig University: Spineology Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 11,489,104 B2 Year: 2021 | 99. Title: \"Orthopedic implant with improved bone growth\" Name: Keith J. Russell University: Medtronic Sofamor Danek USA, Inc. Country: USA Patent number: US 11,491,797 B2 Year: 2021 | 100. Title: \"Method and apparatus for treating osteoarthritis\" Name: Mohamed A. Imam University: Vericel Corporation Country: USA Patent number: US 11,491,877 B2 Year: 2021

Popular Researchers

Popular Researchers

1. David W. Murray, University of Oxford, UK, 86, 52 | 2. Michael R. Baumgaertner, University of Colorado School of Medicine, USA, 80, 52 | 3. Henrik Malchau, Harvard Medical School, USA, 78, 53 | 4. Henrik Kehlet, Rigshospitalet, Denmark, 74, 56 | 5. Andrew D. Pearle, Hospital for Special Surgery, USA, 73, 52 | 6. Paul E. Beaulé, University of Ottawa, Canada, 72, 50 | 7. Timothy S. White, University of California, Los Angeles, USA, 70, 50 | 8. Michael J. Gardner, Stanford University School of Medicine, USA, 70, 47 | 9. Peter D. Asnis, Massachusetts General Hospital, USA, 67, 46 | 10. Kristian Samuelsson, Lund University, Sweden, 66, 36 | 11. Andrew P. Monk, Stanford University School of Medicine, USA, 64, 44 | 12. Henrik Aro, University of Helsinki, Finland, 63, 36 | 13. David C. Markel, University of Michigan, USA, 62, 43 | 14. Hans-Christoph Pape, University Hospital Aachen, Germany, 61, 41 | 15. Keith R. Berend, Joint Implant Surgeons, Inc., USA, 60, 42 | 16. Richard H. Gelberman, Washington University in St. Louis, USA, 60, 42 | 17. Christopher J. Centeno, Centeno-Schultz Clinic, USA, 59, 38 | 18. James L. Carey, Hospital for Special Surgery, USA, 59, 38 | 19. Nicolaas C. Budhiparama, University of Indonesia, Indonesia, 58, 27 | 20. William L. Jaffe, University of California, San Diego, USA, 57, 36 | 21. Marc R. Safran, Stanford University School of Medicine, USA, 57, 36 | 22. Kenneth J. Koval, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, USA, 56, 43 | 23. Eiji Itoi, Tohoku University, Japan, 56, 41 | 24. Kevin E. Black, Pennsylvania State University, USA, 55, 37 | 25. Lisa A. Ferrara, OrthoKinetic Technologies LLC, USA, 55, 30 | 26. Kaj T. A. Krogerus, University of Helsinki, Finland, 54, 33 | 27. Eric M. Black, University of Utah, USA, 54, 31 | 28. Nicola Maffulli, University of Salerno, Italy, 54, 31 | 29. Keith L. Markolf, University of California, San Diego, USA, 54, 31 | 30. Wolfgang Rüther, University Hospital Marburg, Germany, 54, 31 | 31. Michael D. McKee, University of Toronto, Canada, 53, 36 | 32. Martin A. Makary, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, USA, 53, 33 | 33. Thomas E. Brown, Mayo Clinic, USA, 53, 30 | 34. S. Trent Guthrie, University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA, 52, 35 | 35. Aron Lazary, University of Szeged, Hungary, 52, 32 | 36. Hajo Thermann, University of Heidelberg, Germany, 51, 35 | | 37. Martin L. Decrescito, University of Pittsburgh, USA, 51, 35 | 38. Marc Swiontkowski, University of Minnesota, USA, 51, 34 | 39. Michael J. Bosse, Virginia Commonwealth University, USA, 50, 34 | 40. Michel P. Bonnin, Aix-Marseille University, France, 50, 31 | 41. Stéphane Descamps, Sorbonne University, France, 49, 31 | 42. David A. Halsey, University of Pittsburgh, USA, 49, 31 | 43. Stuart B. Goodman, Stanford University School of Medicine, USA, 49, 30 | 44. Benjamin J. Shore, University of Pittsburgh, USA, 49, 30 | 45. Michael J. Yaszemski, Mayo Clinic, USA, 49, 30 | 46. Robert W. Bucholz, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, USA, 48, 37 | 47. Jeffrey A. Weiss, University of Utah, USA, 48, 32 | 48. Michel C. Hoessly, University of Zurich, Switzerland, 48, 31 | 49. Jeffrey O. Anglen, Indiana University School of Medicine, USA, 48, 30 | 50. Max Aebi, University Hospital Basel, Switzerland, 47, 39 | 51. William H. Harris, Massachusetts General Hospital, USA, 47, 37 | 52. Javad Parvizi, Rothman Institute, USA, 47, 34 | 53. John A. Scolaro, University of California, San Francisco, USA, 47, 31 | 54. Joshua J. Jacobs, Rush University Medical Center, USA, 47, 31 | 55. Seung-Hoon Baek, Chonnam National University Medical School, South Korea, 47, 30 | 56. Terry R. Light, University of British Columbia, Canada, 47, 30 | 57. Daniel J. Berry, Mayo Clinic, USA, 46, 39 | 58. Martin Beck, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, 46, 32 | 59. Thomas J. Kean, Duke University School of Medicine, USA, 46, 31 | 60. Michael R. Bracken, Yale School of Medicine, USA, 46, 30 | 61. Paul M. Pellicci, Hospital for Special Surgery, USA, 46, 30 | 62. Rainer H. Meffert, University of Heidelberg, Germany, 46, 29 | 63. Tae Won Kim, Seoul National University College of Medicine, South Korea, 46, 29 | 64. David G. Murray, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Ireland, 46, 29 | 65. Chun-Hoi Yan, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 45, 31 | 66. Charles L. Nelson, University of Pennsylvania, USA, 45, 29 | 67. Takaaki Fujishiro, Tohoku University, Japan, 45, 29 | 68. Clifford W. Colwell Jr., Scripps Clinic, USA, 45, 28 | 69. Ryan F. Coughlin, Orthopedic Specialty Institute, USA, 45, 28 | 70. Robert G. Marx, Hospital for Special Surgery, USA, 45, 28 | 71. Yrjö T. Konttinen, University of Helsinki, Finland, 45, 27 | 72. William L. Healy, University of California, Los Angeles, USA, 45 | | 73. Stephan M. Perren, AO Research Institute Davos, Switzerland, 44, 38 | 74. Lars Engebretsen, University of Oslo, Norway, 44, 36 | 75. Joseph D. Zuckerman, NYU Langone Orthopedic Hospital, USA, 44, 36 | 76. Jesse Bible, University of Utah, USA, 44, 32 | 77. Richard J. Friedman, Hospital for Special Surgery, USA, 44, 31 | 78. Peter C. Amadio, Mayo Clinic, USA, 44, 30 | 79. Mitchell B. Harris, Massachusetts General Hospital, USA, 44, 29 | 80. Norimasa Nakamura, Osaka University, Japan, 44, 29 | 81. Ulrich Noeth, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany, 44, 29 | 82. Michel A. Roffino, Université Côte d\'Azur, France, 44, 29 | 83. James P. Stannard, University of Missouri, USA, 44, 28 | 84. Lawrence X. Webb, University of Pittsburgh, USA, 44, 28 | 85. Bernhard Hirt, University of Würzburg, Germany, 43, 32 | 86. David W. Murray, University of Western Ontario, Canada, 43, 31 | 87. Richard H. Gelberman, Washington University School of Medicine, USA, 43, 30 | 88. Thomas Fuchs, University of Bern, Switzerland, 43, 30 | 89. Yves Allieu, Clinique du Parc, France, 43, 30 | 90. Michael T. Longaker, Stanford University School of Medicine, USA, 43, 29 | 91. M. Bradford Henley, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, USA, 43, 28 | 92. Thierry Pauyo, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, USA, 43, 28 | 93. John A. Buza III, NYU Langone Orthopedic Hospital, USA, 43, 27 | 94. Masanori Akiyama, University of Tokyo, Japan, 43, 27 | 95. David A. Mattingly, University of South Florida, USA, 43, 27 | 96. Jonathan C. Levy, Holy Cross Hospital, USA, 43, 26 | 97. Scott D. Boden, Emory University School of Medicine, USA, 42, 33 | 98. Mark E. Morrey, Mayo Clinic, USA, 42, 32 | 99. Vincent Y. Ng, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, 42, 31 | 100. Xiang-Yang Wang, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, China, 42, 31

Popular Journals

Popular Journals

1. Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (American) - 4.740 | 2. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research (American) - 4.398 | 3. The Bone and Joint Journal (British) - 4.304 | 4. Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (European) - 4.298 | 5. Journal of Orthopaedic Research (American) - 3.336 | 6. Arthritis and Rheumatology (American) - 3.331 | 7. Spine (American) - 2.882 | 8. Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery (American) - 2.764 | 9. Journal of Hand Surgery (American) - 2.763 | 10. Foot and Ankle International (American) - 2.645 | 11. Journal of Arthroplasty (American) - 2.599 | 12. Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery (American) - 2.487 | 13. American Journal of Sports Medicine (American) - 2.456 | 14. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (American) - 2.411 | 15. Journal of Spinal Disorders and Techniques (American) - 2.408 | 16. European Spine Journal (European) - 2.360 | 17. Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics (American) - 2.359 | 18. Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery (American) - 2.335 | 19. Bone (American) - 2.285 | 20. Spine Journal (American) - 2.250 | 21. Journal of Hand Therapy (American) - 2.221 | 22. Journal of Sports Sciences (European) - 2.215 | 23. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy (European) - 2.204 | 24. Journal of Biomechanics (European) - 2.144 | 25. International Journal of Sports Medicine (European) - 2.101 | 26. Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery (European) - 2.077 | 27. Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine (European) - 2.038 | 28. Journal of Bone Oncology (European) - 2.020 | 29. Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine (American) - 2.012 | 30. Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (American) - 1.952 | 31. Journal of Sports Rehabilitation (American) - 1.948 | 32. Foot and Ankle Surgery (European) - 1.940 | 33. Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association (American) - 1.930 | 34. Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness (European) - 1.924 | 35. Journal of Orthopaedic Science (Asian) - 1.919 | 36. Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy (American) - 1.890 | 37. Journal of the American Medical Directors Association (American) - 1.888 | 38. American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (American) - 1.887 | 39. Journal of Foot and Ankle Research (British) - 1.875 | 40. Clinical Anatomy (American) - 1.859 | 41. Injury (European) - 1.835 | 42. Spinal Cord (European) - 1.830 | 43. The Journal of Knee Surgery (American) - 1. | | 44. Journal of Spine Surgery (Chinese) - 1.806 | 45. Journal of the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (American) - 1.786 | 46. Journal of Bone Metabolism (Korean) - 1.754 | 47. Journal of Foot and Ankle Clinics (American) - 1.745 | 48. Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology (European) - 1.727 | 49. Journal of Clinical Densitometry (American) - 1.722 | 50. Journal of Arthroscopy and Related Surgery (Japanese) - 1.703 | 51. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Orthopaedics (European) - 1.687 | 52. Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery (Canadian) - 1.667 | 53. Journal of Osteoporosis and Mineral Metabolism (Japanese) - 1.644 | 54. Journal of Back and Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation (European) - 1.623 | 55. Journal of Orthopaedics and Trauma (European) - 1.618 | 56. International Orthopaedics (European) - 1.614 | 57. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology (Australian) - 1.601 | 58. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders (British) - 1.593 | 59. Journal of Foot and Ankle Research (Canadian) - 1.588 | 60. Journal of Hand and Microsurgery (German) - 1.569 | 61. Journal of Back and Spinal Disorders (American) - 1.568 | 62. Journal of Musculoskeletal Pain (American) - 1.542 | 63. Journal of Spine Research (Japanese) - 1.534 | 64. Journal of Wrist Surgery (American) - 1.534 | 65. Bone and Joint Research (British) - 1.532 | 66. Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics B (American) - 1.526 | 67. International Journal of Orthopaedics (Indian) - 1.524 | 68. Acta Orthopaedica et Traumatologica Turcica (Turkish) - 1.520 | 69. Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery (Asian) - 1.513 | 70. Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism (Japanese) - 1.513 | 71. Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery (Australian) - 1.498 | 72. Spinal Cord Series and Cases (European) - 1.482 | 73. Journal of Sports Medicine (Asian) - 1.477 | 74. Journal of Physical Therapy Science (Japanese) - 1.474 | 75. Journal of Musculoskeletal Research (American) - 1.467 | 76. European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery (European) - 1.464 | 77. Journal of Orthopaedic Case Reports (Indian) - 1.463 | 78. Journal of Joint and Bone Surgery (Brazilian) - 1.462 | 79. Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery (Canadian) - 1.453 | 80. Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery (European) - 1.442 | 81. International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine (Chinese) - 1.436 | 82. Indian Journal of Orthopaedics (Indian) - 1.435 | 83. Orthopaedic Surgery (Chinese) - 1.432 | 84. Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research (Indian) - 1.428 | 85. Journal of Korean Orthopaedic Association (Korean) - 1.427 | 86. Journal of Bone Oncology (American) - | | 87. Hip International (European) - 1.421 | 88. Injury (British) - 1.417 | 89. Journal of Spinal Disorders and Techniques (American) - 1.413 | 90. Journal of Orthopaedic Research and Therapy (American) - 1.410 | 91. Journal of Spine and Joint Surgery (Chinese) - 1.408 | 92. Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research (Chinese) - 1.401 | 93. Spinal Cord (European) - 1.401 | 94. Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery (American) - 1.400 | 95. European Spine Journal (European) - 1.391 | 96. Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma Surgery (Chinese) - 1.387 | 97. Journal of Spinal Disorders and Techniques (European) - 1.383 | 98. Journal of Orthopaedic Science (Japanese) - 1.381 | 99. Journal of Orthopaedics (Indian) - 1.370 | 100. European Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology (European) - 1.355

Orthopedics now cares for patients of all ages, from newborns with clubfeet, to young athletes requiring arthroscopic surgery, to older people with arthritis. The physicians who specialize in this area are called Orthopedics surgeons or Orthopedists.

  • Upper extremity and hand
  • Paediatric Orthopedics
  • Orthopedic oncology
  • Dermatology in Orthopedics
  • Shoulder and elbow

Track 02: Biomaterials in Orthopedics

Worldwide, millions of people suffer from inflammatory and degenerative conditions of the bones and joints. In wealthy countries, they make up half of all chronic disorders affecting adults over 50. Additionally, it is anticipated that by 2020, the proportion of people over 50 affected by bone illnesses would double.

Surgery is frequently necessary for many disorders, including total joint replacement when the natural joint has degenerated. Additionally, countless bone fractures, back discomfort, osteoporosis, scoliosis, and other musculoskeletal issues must be treated with permanent, temporary, or biodegradable prostheses.

Orthopedic biomaterials are therefore intended to be implanted in the human body as components of devices that are supposed to fulfill certain biological activities by replacing or mending various tissues like bone, cartilage, ligaments, and tendons, and even by assisting bone repair when necessary.

The most often used first-generation ceramic biomaterials are alumina, zirconia, and various porous ceramics. There are only a few formulas available for these non-metallic inorganic compounds.

  • Ceramic materials
  • Ceramic implants
  • Ceramics in orthopedic surgery
  • joint replacement using ceramic implants
  • Polymers
  • Orthopedics Biomechanics
  • Arthroplasty
  • Total wrist arthroplasty

Track 03:Musculoskeletal System

This system consists of bones, muscles cartilages, and connective tissues which help to maintain posture and in moving. This system undergoes many changes as we grow old.

The musculoskeletal system can be affected by a variety of illnesses and conditions. Pain and limited mobility can be caused by aging, traumas, congenital anomalies (birth defects), and disease.

  • Collage
  • Fibers
  • Ligaments
  • Movements
  • Blood circulation

Track 04:Traumatic injuries

In Orthopedics medicineorthopedic trauma is categorized as a severe injury to the elements of the musculoskeletal system. Trauma injuries are frequently the consequence of an unexpected mishap, such as a fall, that necessitates quick medical attention.

An injury can be trivial, such as cutting a finger when opening a metal can or fracturing a bone while participating in sports. While these can be painful or uncomfortable, once the injury has been treated by a GP, health clinic, or emergency department, the person will usually be allowed to return home.

Trauma standards were originally established in the United States in 1976, and a sophisticated trauma network today serves us all, no matter where we live, work, or travel.

  • Fractures
  • Dislocations
  • Epiphysial injuries
  • Nerve injuries
  • Traumatic Brain Injuries

Track 05: Osteoarthritis

The most common type of arthritis, osteoarthritis, affects millions of individuals worldwide. Degenerative joint disease is often known as "wear and tear" arthritis. The hands, hips, and knees are the most typically affected areas. The cartilage in a joint begins to break down, and the underlying bone changes as a result of Osteoarthritis. OA indications and symptoms include Swelling, stiffness, decreased range of motion (or flexibility), and pain or discomfort. Because there is no cure for OA, doctors usually treat the symptoms with a mix of treatments, which may include, Physical activity should be increased, weight-loss medications, including over-the-counter and prescription pain relievers

  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Psoriatic Arthritis
  • Deformity and loss of function
  • Spondylarthritis
  • Acute inflammatory Arthritis
  • Inflammatory Arthritis
  • Septic Arthritis
  • Metabolic Arthritis
  • Infectious Arthritis

 

Track 06:Trauma

Trauma is an injury or damage to living tissue caused by an external agent. In physical medicine, Major trauma is also an injury that can possibly lead to severe long-term consequences like chronic pain. A traumatic injury is an injury triggered by an extrinsic agent, but which does not rise to the level of major trauma. Traumatic injuries are notable from other sources of injury, such as iatrogenic injuries.

  • Elderly Trauma and Critical Care
  • Intensive Care in Trauma
  • Obstetric Trauma
  • Psychological Trauma
  • Pediatric Trauma
  • Trauma-Emergency Medicine
  • Trauma Therapy
  • New Technology in Trauma
  • Uncommon Malignant Tumors

Track 07: Orthopedics Surgery

Orthopedics Surgery is the branch of surgery concerned with conditions involving the musculoskeletal system and focuses on patient care in each of these orthopedic subspecialties adult reconstruction and joint replacement, sports medicine, spine surgery, surgery of the hand and wrist, surgery of the shoulder and elbow, surgery of the foot and ankle, musculoskeletal tumor surgery, orthopedic trauma Surgery, pediatric orthopaedics, and physical medicine and rehabilitation.

  • Hand Surgery
  • Shoulder and elbow surgery
  • Total joint reconstruction
  • Foot and Ankle Surgery
  • Bone Grafting
  • Fracture Repair
  • Kneecap Removal
  • Fasciotomy

Track 08:Rheumatology

Rheumatology is a branch of medicine devoted to the diagnosis and treatment of rheumatic diseases. It affects your joints tendons, ligaments, bones, and muscles. It is a subspecialty in internal medicine and pediatrics, which is devoted to adequate diagnosis and therapy of rheumatic diseases. It also investigates the stiffness, joint pain, and different issue of the joints, muscles, and tendons. Branches of rheumatology involve basic research and clinical research, as well as clinical diagnosis, treatment, and long-term management of patients with these illnesses. Physicians who have undergone training in rheumatology are called rheumatologists. A rheumatologist is an expert in the field of nonsurgical treatment of rheumatic illnesses, including autoimmune diseases and especially the many forms of arthritis and joint disease. The rheumatology field is multidisciplinary, which means it relies on close relationships with other medical specialties. Rheumatologists deal mainly with immune-mediated disorders of the musculoskeletal system, soft tissues, autoimmune diseases, and heritable connective tissue disorders.

  • Autoimmune Disorders
  • Rheumatic Fever
  • Complications and Precautions
  • Diagnosis and Treatment of Rheumatic Diseases

Track 09:Arthroplasty

Arthroplasty is a surgical methodology of Orthopedics for the restoration, resurfacing, realignment, and for the reconstruction of joints. The most common reason behind arthroplasty is the cause of stiffened joints and to relieve the extreme pains in joints. Arthroplasty is preferred when the medical treatment no longer provides enough relief from pain and disability. The most common medical treatments carried out before arthroplasty are Pain medicines, Physical therapies, Anti-inflammatory medicines, Corticosteroid injections, Viscosupplementation injections, and Exercise and conditioning. Arthroscopy is the minimally invasive surgical process carried out in the treatment of joints using an Arthroscope. The injuries caused in the muscular-skeletal system leading to Orthopedics trauma results in the surgery procedure of Arthroplasty and Arthroscope.

  • Dimensions of Arthroplasty
  • Arthroplasty Vs Arthroscopy
  • Joint surgeries
  • Instrumental Developments

Ligament reconstruction

Track 10:Foot and Ankle Surgery

Surgery may be used to treat a number of foot and ankle disorders. Foot and ankle surgery is typically chosen only after nonsurgical procedures have failed to produce the intended results. Certain situations, particularly acute injuries like ankle fractures, may, nevertheless, necessitate emergency surgery.

There are a variety of surgical techniques available to treat foot and ankle problems. The operation may be performed to align broken bones, fuse uncomfortable joints, remove overgrowth tissue, or repair a torn ligament or tendon, depending on the nature of the problem. Total ankle replacement may be recommended in cases of extensive damage and considerable pain in the ankle joint.

  • Bunions
  • Hammer's toes
  • Metatarsal
  • Ankle arthritis
  • Morton’s neuroma
  • Plantar fasciitis
  • Achilles tendon disorders

Track 11: Veterinary Orthopedic and Sports Medicine

Infectious diseases of animals area unit a significant hazard to animal health and welfare and their effective management is critical for agronomical health, for defensive and procuring national and international food provides and for mitigating the agricultural economic condition in developing countries. Some fatal stock diseases area unit regional in several elements of the planet and threats from previous and new pathogens still rise, with changes to worldwide climate, agricultural approaches and social science presenting conditions that area unit particularly subsidiary for the unfold of arthropod-borne diseases and different infectious diseases.

Related: Orthopedic and Sports Medicine; Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Conferences: International Conferences: Global Congress on infectious Diseases: Conferences on Orthopedic and Sports Medicine.

Related Societies and Associations: International Society for Orthopedic and Sports Medicine; Australasian Society for Orthopedic and Sports Medicine; The Korean Society for Orthopedic and Sports Medicine; International Federation of Infection Control; World Society for Pediatric In Infectious; Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Society of  America.

Track 12: Bacterial, Viral, Fungal Infections

The disease-causing agents within the organism their multiplication and therefore the reaction of host tissues to the infectious agents and therefore the toxins they turn out results in infection. Infections area unit caused by parasites, virus, bacteria, fungi, etc. infectious agent infections involves completely different elements of the body or quite one part at an identical time which can be a fluid nose, sinus congestion, cough, body aches, etc. Few infectious agent infections like herpes area unit painful. The pain of infectious agent infections is commonly shown by the burning or cutaneous sensation on several halves.

Related: Orthopedic and Sports Medicine; Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Conferences: International Conferences: Global Congress on infectious Diseases: Conferences on Orthopedic and Sports Medicine.

Related Societies and Associations: International Society for Orthopedic and Sports Medicine; Australasian Society for Orthopedic and Sports Medicine; The Korean Society for Orthopedic and Sports Medicine; International Federation of Infection Control; World Society for Pediatric In Infectious; Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Society of  America.

 

Key Features

Journal Publication | Conference Proceedings with ISBN  | Inspiring Speakers | Excellent Venue | Conference Kit | Certificate | Excellent Non Veg /Veg Buffet Lunch

Conference Awards

Best Presentation Awards | Best Poster Awards | Best Paper Awards

Conference Subject Tracks

Anterior Longitudinal Ligament, Arthroplasty, Arthroscopy, Bone and Joint Infections, Consequences of Arthroscopy, Exercise and Sports Medicine, Foot and ankle surgery, Hand and upper extremity, Hip and Knee surgery, Hip Arthroplasty, Joint Disorders, Knee Arthroplasty, Medical Malpractice and Legal Issues, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Obesity and Weight Management, Orthopedic Clinical Determination, Orthopedic oncologist, Orthopedic trauma, Orthopedics, Orthopedics Surgery, Osseointegration, Osteoarthritis, Osteoporosis, Pain Management, Pediatric orthopedics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Podiatry, Prosthetics and Orthotics, Residents, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Shoulder and elbow, Shoulder Arthroplasty, Spinal Disorders, Spinal Surgery, Surgical sports medicine, Total joint reconstruction (arthroplasty), Other

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